Editorial: Zoology is dead, long live zoology!

Editorial: Zoology is dead, long live zoology! Once upon a time, the division of biological disciplines was simple. You were either an animal biologist (zoologist) or a plant biologist (botanist). Nowadays, scientists seem to rarely use the term zoology in professional descriptions. So, why have zoologists stopped calling themselves zoologists? And what does this mean for biology in general? I am addressing these questions because the journal you are reading is going into its 10 th year under the current name, Animal Biology . As the official journal of the 140-year-old Royal Dutch Zoological Society (founded 1872), it first appeared in 1934 as Archives Néerlandaises de Zoologie . Interestingly, despite its French title most articles were written in English or German. The journal was renamed as Netherlands Journal of Zoology in 1953 and got its current title in 2003. In other words, Animal Biology can boast a rich zoological tradition. So, what happened to zoology over the past century? Obviously, due to the enormous breadth of the field, zoology has split up. The numerous (sub)disciplines that emerged from it now focus on different scales and biological levels. At the far ends one finds, for example, small-scale molecular disciplines and large-scale population and ecosystem approaches. This http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Animal Biology Brill

Editorial: Zoology is dead, long live zoology!

Animal Biology , Volume 62 (4): 379 – Jan 1, 2012

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Editorial
ISSN
1570-7555
eISSN
1570-7563
D.O.I.
10.1163/15707563-00002403
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Once upon a time, the division of biological disciplines was simple. You were either an animal biologist (zoologist) or a plant biologist (botanist). Nowadays, scientists seem to rarely use the term zoology in professional descriptions. So, why have zoologists stopped calling themselves zoologists? And what does this mean for biology in general? I am addressing these questions because the journal you are reading is going into its 10 th year under the current name, Animal Biology . As the official journal of the 140-year-old Royal Dutch Zoological Society (founded 1872), it first appeared in 1934 as Archives Néerlandaises de Zoologie . Interestingly, despite its French title most articles were written in English or German. The journal was renamed as Netherlands Journal of Zoology in 1953 and got its current title in 2003. In other words, Animal Biology can boast a rich zoological tradition. So, what happened to zoology over the past century? Obviously, due to the enormous breadth of the field, zoology has split up. The numerous (sub)disciplines that emerged from it now focus on different scales and biological levels. At the far ends one finds, for example, small-scale molecular disciplines and large-scale population and ecosystem approaches. This

Journal

Animal BiologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2012

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