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Editorial

Editorial Book Review Withthefirstnumberofthe2011volume,theJournalofAfricanArchaeologyhasgivenitselfanewlook:inits ninth year of publication, the outer appearance of the Journal has been refreshed, and internal re-structuring (the sequence of editors) has likewise occurred. The overall concept of the Journal of African Archaeology as a pan-African archaeological periodical open foralltopicsandtimeperiodshas,however,notchanged.Thus,inthecurrentissue,fivearticlesprovideamajor temporal cross-section ranging from the MSA (I. Schmidt) over the Later Stone Age (I. Parsons) and Iron Age (A. González-Ruibal and others; T. Insoll and others) up to the Late Iron Age and historical times (M. Wood). With this mix of articles, a virtual longitudinal section from northern Ghana down the western African coast to Equatorial Guinea and Namibia up to Southern Africa is provided, though the southernmost half of the continent has, admittedly, a greater weight. Thematically, several of the most important archaeological materials and features in the African archaeological record are the focus of the articles: lithics (articles by I. Schmidt and I. Parsons), ceramics (article by T. Insoll et al.), beads (article by M. Wood), iron objects, and pits/graves (article by A. González-Ruibal et al.). A sample from the current literature in African archaeology is also provided by eight book reviews of titles published in 2009 or 2010 that were assembled by our book review editor Tim Insoll. Instead of only focussing on a particular period, region, or material, we aim to provide with this assortment of articles and book reviews a new issue of the Journal of African Archaeology that meets with the interests of most readers. For those that miss more news from the northern half of the African continent, we promise that the second number of this volume will counterbalance that. Sonja Magnavita Frankfurt a. M., June 2011 Peter Breunig Journal of African Archaeology Vol. 8 (2), 2010 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Archaeology Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2011 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1612-1651
eISSN
2191-5784
DOI
10.1163/21915784-90000005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Review Withthefirstnumberofthe2011volume,theJournalofAfricanArchaeologyhasgivenitselfanewlook:inits ninth year of publication, the outer appearance of the Journal has been refreshed, and internal re-structuring (the sequence of editors) has likewise occurred. The overall concept of the Journal of African Archaeology as a pan-African archaeological periodical open foralltopicsandtimeperiodshas,however,notchanged.Thus,inthecurrentissue,fivearticlesprovideamajor temporal cross-section ranging from the MSA (I. Schmidt) over the Later Stone Age (I. Parsons) and Iron Age (A. González-Ruibal and others; T. Insoll and others) up to the Late Iron Age and historical times (M. Wood). With this mix of articles, a virtual longitudinal section from northern Ghana down the western African coast to Equatorial Guinea and Namibia up to Southern Africa is provided, though the southernmost half of the continent has, admittedly, a greater weight. Thematically, several of the most important archaeological materials and features in the African archaeological record are the focus of the articles: lithics (articles by I. Schmidt and I. Parsons), ceramics (article by T. Insoll et al.), beads (article by M. Wood), iron objects, and pits/graves (article by A. González-Ruibal et al.). A sample from the current literature in African archaeology is also provided by eight book reviews of titles published in 2009 or 2010 that were assembled by our book review editor Tim Insoll. Instead of only focussing on a particular period, region, or material, we aim to provide with this assortment of articles and book reviews a new issue of the Journal of African Archaeology that meets with the interests of most readers. For those that miss more news from the northern half of the African continent, we promise that the second number of this volume will counterbalance that. Sonja Magnavita Frankfurt a. M., June 2011 Peter Breunig Journal of African Archaeology Vol. 8 (2), 2010

Journal

Journal of African ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Oct 25, 2011

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