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Editorial Introduction

Editorial Introduction Editorial Introduction The 2001 Nobel Prize for Literature went to Gao Xingjian, a recently naturalised French citizen of Chinese origin, for his travel novel Soul Mountain (Ling Shan) . (Mistakenly) diagnosed with cancer and fleeing not just his physical death but social and intellectual demise – in the heyday of the struggle between freedom of artistic and political expression and denunciation of bourgeois liberalisation in China in the mid 1980s – Gao plunged deep into the mountains of southwest China where he wandered among the Qiang, Miao, and Yi peoples. Rather than despising them as was customary in China with respect to all things minority, Gao found a source of literary and artistic inspiration, a gust of fresh air badly needed for coping with the suffocating political atmosphere. Immersing himself in the wild folk songs, mystical spiritual practices, and breathtaking and untamed landscapes, Gao reemerged energised, discovering new sublimity in life, regain- ing his repressed soul and voice. Thus resuscitated Gao went on to France in search of new meanings and opportunities for self-expression. Gao’s is not the only, though he is the most internationally acclaimed Chinese author to explore the lives of ethnic minorities. In recent years http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Inner Asia Brill

Editorial Introduction

Inner Asia , Volume 4 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 2002

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2002 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1464-8172
eISSN
2210-5018
DOI
10.1163/146481702793647597
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorial Introduction The 2001 Nobel Prize for Literature went to Gao Xingjian, a recently naturalised French citizen of Chinese origin, for his travel novel Soul Mountain (Ling Shan) . (Mistakenly) diagnosed with cancer and fleeing not just his physical death but social and intellectual demise – in the heyday of the struggle between freedom of artistic and political expression and denunciation of bourgeois liberalisation in China in the mid 1980s – Gao plunged deep into the mountains of southwest China where he wandered among the Qiang, Miao, and Yi peoples. Rather than despising them as was customary in China with respect to all things minority, Gao found a source of literary and artistic inspiration, a gust of fresh air badly needed for coping with the suffocating political atmosphere. Immersing himself in the wild folk songs, mystical spiritual practices, and breathtaking and untamed landscapes, Gao reemerged energised, discovering new sublimity in life, regain- ing his repressed soul and voice. Thus resuscitated Gao went on to France in search of new meanings and opportunities for self-expression. Gao’s is not the only, though he is the most internationally acclaimed Chinese author to explore the lives of ethnic minorities. In recent years

Journal

Inner AsiaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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