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Editorial Introduction

Editorial Introduction This issue of Inner Asia derives from an international research project, 1 ‘Where Rising Powers Meet: China and Russian at their North Asian Border’, based at the University of Cambridge under the leadership of Caroline Humphrey. The issue looks historically at the border landscape shared by these countries. The contributors are researchers who not only do ‘field-work’ in present-day border regions but also delve into archival folders to get a better understanding of various long-term border dynamics. The China–Russia–Mongolia border in historical retrospective is a very complex phenomenon, not only due to its length and geographical complexity, but also because it combines political relations between great states with its own character as a unique social space made up of various constellations of culturally interrelated border societies. This is amply illustrated by the seven papers of the issue, which focuses on different sections along the border and show that these constellations could change in time, regroup, and voluntarily or by force detach from one side and attach to another. 2 Detachable–Attachable Persons With the expansion of the Russian Empire and the Qing Dynasty in Inner Asia in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, many nomadic peoples found themselves in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Inner Asia Brill

Editorial Introduction

Inner Asia , Volume 16 (1): 1 – Aug 19, 2014

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Other
ISSN
1464-8172
eISSN
2210-5018
DOI
10.1163/22105018-12340001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This issue of Inner Asia derives from an international research project, 1 ‘Where Rising Powers Meet: China and Russian at their North Asian Border’, based at the University of Cambridge under the leadership of Caroline Humphrey. The issue looks historically at the border landscape shared by these countries. The contributors are researchers who not only do ‘field-work’ in present-day border regions but also delve into archival folders to get a better understanding of various long-term border dynamics. The China–Russia–Mongolia border in historical retrospective is a very complex phenomenon, not only due to its length and geographical complexity, but also because it combines political relations between great states with its own character as a unique social space made up of various constellations of culturally interrelated border societies. This is amply illustrated by the seven papers of the issue, which focuses on different sections along the border and show that these constellations could change in time, regroup, and voluntarily or by force detach from one side and attach to another. 2 Detachable–Attachable Persons With the expansion of the Russian Empire and the Qing Dynasty in Inner Asia in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, many nomadic peoples found themselves in

Journal

Inner AsiaBrill

Published: Aug 19, 2014

Keywords: border societies; detachable-attachable persons; mobility

References