Editorial

Editorial 51 International Law FORUM du droit international 4 : 51, 2002. ©2002 Kluwer Law International. Printed in the Netherlands. Editorial Volume 4 No. 2 If the world is indeed a different place after the events of 11 September last year, it seems to be premature for anyone to venture to assess what will be the lasting changes to our international environment. The time for initial reactions is past; the initial shock is beginning to recede. The ‘malaise’ which Catherine Kessedjian detects among the normally prolific international legal community, as described in her introduction to our ‘Recurring Themes’ section, may simply be a reflection of the fact that, only six months on, it is too early, for the long-term consequences for the structure and practice of international law to have begun to emerge. The world of international law is still struggling to accommodate and analyse what took place within the framework of existing definitions and concepts – it is as if we have been overtaken by events. An array of legislative measures has, meanwhile, been adopted in the United States to cut off the main economic supply lines to terrorist organi- sations. The implications for the legal and business communities of functioning against this background of heightened vigilance are explored by Peter D. Trooboff and Masanobu Katoh. In our ‘In the News’ section, Surya Subedi reviews the UN conference on Fi- nancing for Development held in March this year in Monterrey. The subject of our Profile, contributed by Cesare Romano, is Shepard Forman, Director of the Centre of International Cooperation at New York University. For ‘Work in Progress’, Eric Wyler contributes an update on the recent Geneva seminar on reparation for crimes against humanity. In ‘Conference Scene’, Yitiha Simbeye reviews a recent conference in Amsterdam on the practice and prospects for internationalised crimi- nal courts and tribunals, and Walid Ben Hamida reports on the Swiss Arbitration Association conference on investment treaties and arbitration. Eduardo Valencia Ospina, whose ‘Bookshelf ’ we feature, entices us into the world of literature in his mother tongue, Spanish. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Law FORUM du droit international (continued in International Community Law Review) Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2002 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1388-9036
eISSN
1571-8042
D.O.I.
10.1163/15718040220963147
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

51 International Law FORUM du droit international 4 : 51, 2002. ©2002 Kluwer Law International. Printed in the Netherlands. Editorial Volume 4 No. 2 If the world is indeed a different place after the events of 11 September last year, it seems to be premature for anyone to venture to assess what will be the lasting changes to our international environment. The time for initial reactions is past; the initial shock is beginning to recede. The ‘malaise’ which Catherine Kessedjian detects among the normally prolific international legal community, as described in her introduction to our ‘Recurring Themes’ section, may simply be a reflection of the fact that, only six months on, it is too early, for the long-term consequences for the structure and practice of international law to have begun to emerge. The world of international law is still struggling to accommodate and analyse what took place within the framework of existing definitions and concepts – it is as if we have been overtaken by events. An array of legislative measures has, meanwhile, been adopted in the United States to cut off the main economic supply lines to terrorist organi- sations. The implications for the legal and business communities of functioning against this background of heightened vigilance are explored by Peter D. Trooboff and Masanobu Katoh. In our ‘In the News’ section, Surya Subedi reviews the UN conference on Fi- nancing for Development held in March this year in Monterrey. The subject of our Profile, contributed by Cesare Romano, is Shepard Forman, Director of the Centre of International Cooperation at New York University. For ‘Work in Progress’, Eric Wyler contributes an update on the recent Geneva seminar on reparation for crimes against humanity. In ‘Conference Scene’, Yitiha Simbeye reviews a recent conference in Amsterdam on the practice and prospects for internationalised crimi- nal courts and tribunals, and Walid Ben Hamida reports on the Swiss Arbitration Association conference on investment treaties and arbitration. Eduardo Valencia Ospina, whose ‘Bookshelf ’ we feature, entices us into the world of literature in his mother tongue, Spanish.

Journal

International Law FORUM du droit international (continued in International Community Law Review)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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