Editorial

Editorial 65 International Law FORUM du droit international 2 : 65, 2000. ©2000 Kluwer Law International. Printed in the Netherlands. Editorial Volume 2, No. 2 Our recurring themes section this time treats the relationship between national means for addressing situations of gross violations of human rights and applicable international standards and procedures. It includes contributions by Garth Meintjes and Juan Méndez, Michelle Parlevliet and Jeremy Sarkin. The contributions focus, in particular, on the relationship between international standards and national means that aim primarily at attaining reconciliation in national society, such as truth commissions and amnesties. The central question addressed in these contri- butions is the extent to which states should enjoy discretionary powers to determine the manner in which they address gross human rights violations in their past that have left a sharp cleavage in their societies. On the one hand, reconciliatory procedures are probably better suited to take into account the specific situation in the society in question, and often are regarded as contributing to the process of democratization in those societies. On the other hand, such procedures may not meet the international minimum requirements of fair trial or do justice to the rights of the victims and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Law FORUM du droit international (continued in International Community Law Review) Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2000 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1388-9036
eISSN
1571-8042
D.O.I.
10.1163/15718040020962465
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

65 International Law FORUM du droit international 2 : 65, 2000. ©2000 Kluwer Law International. Printed in the Netherlands. Editorial Volume 2, No. 2 Our recurring themes section this time treats the relationship between national means for addressing situations of gross violations of human rights and applicable international standards and procedures. It includes contributions by Garth Meintjes and Juan Méndez, Michelle Parlevliet and Jeremy Sarkin. The contributions focus, in particular, on the relationship between international standards and national means that aim primarily at attaining reconciliation in national society, such as truth commissions and amnesties. The central question addressed in these contri- butions is the extent to which states should enjoy discretionary powers to determine the manner in which they address gross human rights violations in their past that have left a sharp cleavage in their societies. On the one hand, reconciliatory procedures are probably better suited to take into account the specific situation in the society in question, and often are regarded as contributing to the process of democratization in those societies. On the other hand, such procedures may not meet the international minimum requirements of fair trial or do justice to the rights of the victims and

Journal

International Law FORUM du droit international (continued in International Community Law Review)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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