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Editorial

Editorial Editorial Current developments show that there will be an increase in the number of international pan-African orientated journals for the years to come. This is a welcome advance for African archaeology and, in fact, it must be admitted that the diversity and abundance of topics from 2.5 million years of human history on a third of the inhabitable earth's surface deserves and requires a couple of good journals. In this regard, the Journal of African Archaeology appears to be well positioned, in particular since it has been recently indexed in Thomson Scientific: Arts and Humanities Citation Index, Current Contents / Arts & Humanities since 2007, and in SCOPUS (an Elsevier service) from early 2009 onwards. Getting a journal high-ranked indexed a few years after the first volume appeared, might be registered as the success of a good concept. We would like to thank all our authors and all reviewers for enabling this success. Particular thanks go to those colleagues concerned with the accomplishment of the present issue which presents a variety of significant articles. Geographically this volume covers the East, West, South and North of Africa, chronologically Holocene developments, and thematically topics like bead grinders, urbanism, migration, rock art, graves and textiles. East Africa is represented by an article of James L. Flexner, Jeffrey B. Fleisher and Adria LaViolette considering a large assemblage of bead grinders from the site of Tumbe on Pemba Island, Tanzania, dated to the 7th ­ 10th centuries AD, with regard to the organization of production on an individual household level. Referring to sites of Akonétye in southern Cameroon, Conny Meister and Manfred K.H. Eggert report of discoveries of ceramics and particularly an impressive abundance of a variety of iron objects supposed to be grave goods and dated to the Early Iron Age. Understanding the significance of rock art is another challenge, taken up by Sam Challis, Peter Mitchell and Jayson Orton in the case of previously undescribed rock art sites in the Highland Lesotho. The authors place the images in a shamanistic context and argue for rain-making rituals probably related to fishing. Donatella Usai considers the relation between populations in the Nile Valley of Sudanese Nubia and the Western Desert in early Holocene times on the basis of comparison between sites like El Kortein/Bir Kiseiba and new sites in the Wadi Karagan. To Graham Connah we owe recommendations concerning research strategies to improve the archaeological visibility of African complex societies, which is a challenge to adequate methods as well as funding. Sonja Magnavita presents the oldest textile remains yet known from Sub-Saharan West Africa, found in graves at the site of Kissi, Burkina Faso, predominantly dated to the 1st millennium AD. Five book reviews complete the present volume. In order to intensify the review of recent publications on African Archaeology, a book review editor will join the editorial team from the next volume onwards. We are glad to announce that Timothy Insoll, University of Manchester, Great Britain, will be engaged in this position. We are pleased to announce that besides the Journal of African Archaeology Monograph Series, Africa Magna Verlag will launch a new monographic series from 2009 onwards not coupled with the Journal of African Archaeology, the Reports in African Archaeology. This new series especially addresses authors of dissertations, project reports, proceedings etc. and aims at publishing fast and at low cost for authors. Frankfurt a. M., December 2008 Sonja Magnavita Peter Breunig Journal of African Archaeology Vol. 6 (2), 2008 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Archaeology Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2008 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1612-1651
eISSN
2191-5784
DOI
10.1163/21915784-90000012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorial Current developments show that there will be an increase in the number of international pan-African orientated journals for the years to come. This is a welcome advance for African archaeology and, in fact, it must be admitted that the diversity and abundance of topics from 2.5 million years of human history on a third of the inhabitable earth's surface deserves and requires a couple of good journals. In this regard, the Journal of African Archaeology appears to be well positioned, in particular since it has been recently indexed in Thomson Scientific: Arts and Humanities Citation Index, Current Contents / Arts & Humanities since 2007, and in SCOPUS (an Elsevier service) from early 2009 onwards. Getting a journal high-ranked indexed a few years after the first volume appeared, might be registered as the success of a good concept. We would like to thank all our authors and all reviewers for enabling this success. Particular thanks go to those colleagues concerned with the accomplishment of the present issue which presents a variety of significant articles. Geographically this volume covers the East, West, South and North of Africa, chronologically Holocene developments, and thematically topics like bead grinders, urbanism, migration, rock art, graves and textiles. East Africa is represented by an article of James L. Flexner, Jeffrey B. Fleisher and Adria LaViolette considering a large assemblage of bead grinders from the site of Tumbe on Pemba Island, Tanzania, dated to the 7th ­ 10th centuries AD, with regard to the organization of production on an individual household level. Referring to sites of Akonétye in southern Cameroon, Conny Meister and Manfred K.H. Eggert report of discoveries of ceramics and particularly an impressive abundance of a variety of iron objects supposed to be grave goods and dated to the Early Iron Age. Understanding the significance of rock art is another challenge, taken up by Sam Challis, Peter Mitchell and Jayson Orton in the case of previously undescribed rock art sites in the Highland Lesotho. The authors place the images in a shamanistic context and argue for rain-making rituals probably related to fishing. Donatella Usai considers the relation between populations in the Nile Valley of Sudanese Nubia and the Western Desert in early Holocene times on the basis of comparison between sites like El Kortein/Bir Kiseiba and new sites in the Wadi Karagan. To Graham Connah we owe recommendations concerning research strategies to improve the archaeological visibility of African complex societies, which is a challenge to adequate methods as well as funding. Sonja Magnavita presents the oldest textile remains yet known from Sub-Saharan West Africa, found in graves at the site of Kissi, Burkina Faso, predominantly dated to the 1st millennium AD. Five book reviews complete the present volume. In order to intensify the review of recent publications on African Archaeology, a book review editor will join the editorial team from the next volume onwards. We are glad to announce that Timothy Insoll, University of Manchester, Great Britain, will be engaged in this position. We are pleased to announce that besides the Journal of African Archaeology Monograph Series, Africa Magna Verlag will launch a new monographic series from 2009 onwards not coupled with the Journal of African Archaeology, the Reports in African Archaeology. This new series especially addresses authors of dissertations, project reports, proceedings etc. and aims at publishing fast and at low cost for authors. Frankfurt a. M., December 2008 Sonja Magnavita Peter Breunig Journal of African Archaeology Vol. 6 (2), 2008

Journal

Journal of African ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Oct 25, 2008

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