Editorial

Editorial 183 International Law FORUM du droit international 4 : 183, 2002. ©2002 Kluwer Law International. Printed in the Netherlands. Editorial Volume 4, No. 4 We open this issue of FORUM with an appraisal by Marie-Isabelle Pellan of the achievements – unspectacular, maybe, but real nonetheless – of the recent Johan- nesburg summit, in reinforcing the commitment to the goals of sustainable devel- opment enshrined in the earlier Doha Declaration. Our main theme is the teaching of international law. In her Introduction, Ellen Hey synthesises the range of comments and short contributions that were offered by the practitioners and academics we approached. We are pleased to publish the considered – sometimes even radical – views of Hans Corell, John King Gamble and Gerard Tanja, whose different professional and national perspectives invite us to challenge some of our long-held assumptions about what forms of teaching are optimal, feasible or even desirable. Ronald St. John Macdonald is a fine example of someone who has achieved a wide reputation as an inspirational teacher. Craig Scott, in his Profile, tells us why. And, in a Bookshelf characterised by undisguised enthusiasm for his subject, Alain Pellet presents the lessons – not least of them in logic and lucidity of expression – to be learned from the International Law Commission Report of the late Roberto Ago on State Responsibility. In times of threatened conflict, as we have seen recently, we look to professors of international law to pronounce with authority and objectivity on what interna- tional law will or will not allow, and they are listened to. But the teaching of international law should not be regarded as the preserve of academics alone, though they deservedly take pride of place. As Ellen Hey points out in her Introduction, it matters too much. Each of us who is engaged, in whatever capacity, in any kind of international legal practice or function, shares in the responsibility to promote the understanding of, and respect for, international law both public and private. Law is, after all, employed most often and most productively as an instrument for avoid- ing, as well as resolving, conflict, and this is because it is relevant to, and provides the underpinning for, many of the forms of international interchange that lawyers regularly handle. The greater their awareness of this, the better. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Law FORUM du droit international (continued in International Community Law Review) Brill

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Publisher
Martinus Nijhoff
Copyright
© 2002 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1388-9036
eISSN
1571-8042
D.O.I.
10.1163/15718040260652247
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

183 International Law FORUM du droit international 4 : 183, 2002. ©2002 Kluwer Law International. Printed in the Netherlands. Editorial Volume 4, No. 4 We open this issue of FORUM with an appraisal by Marie-Isabelle Pellan of the achievements – unspectacular, maybe, but real nonetheless – of the recent Johan- nesburg summit, in reinforcing the commitment to the goals of sustainable devel- opment enshrined in the earlier Doha Declaration. Our main theme is the teaching of international law. In her Introduction, Ellen Hey synthesises the range of comments and short contributions that were offered by the practitioners and academics we approached. We are pleased to publish the considered – sometimes even radical – views of Hans Corell, John King Gamble and Gerard Tanja, whose different professional and national perspectives invite us to challenge some of our long-held assumptions about what forms of teaching are optimal, feasible or even desirable. Ronald St. John Macdonald is a fine example of someone who has achieved a wide reputation as an inspirational teacher. Craig Scott, in his Profile, tells us why. And, in a Bookshelf characterised by undisguised enthusiasm for his subject, Alain Pellet presents the lessons – not least of them in logic and lucidity of expression – to be learned from the International Law Commission Report of the late Roberto Ago on State Responsibility. In times of threatened conflict, as we have seen recently, we look to professors of international law to pronounce with authority and objectivity on what interna- tional law will or will not allow, and they are listened to. But the teaching of international law should not be regarded as the preserve of academics alone, though they deservedly take pride of place. As Ellen Hey points out in her Introduction, it matters too much. Each of us who is engaged, in whatever capacity, in any kind of international legal practice or function, shares in the responsibility to promote the understanding of, and respect for, international law both public and private. Law is, after all, employed most often and most productively as an instrument for avoid- ing, as well as resolving, conflict, and this is because it is relevant to, and provides the underpinning for, many of the forms of international interchange that lawyers regularly handle. The greater their awareness of this, the better.

Journal

International Law FORUM du droit international (continued in International Community Law Review)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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