Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Editor’s Note

Editor’s Note This first issue of Central Asian Affairs comes out in spring 2014, at a time when Western pundits are venting their concerns about the withdrawal of international troops from Afghanistan and the possible chaos that might descend on Afghanistan and its neighbors as a result. They also complain about the sharply waning interest shown by policy decision-makers for this region of the world. This Cassandra-like view is undoubtedly a byproduct of the media world and of think-tank expertise relating to the wider Central Asian region, and has been part of their intellectual production for more than a decade. It leads to a purely utilitarian view of the region, revolving entirely around security issues, as well as to an alarmist narrative that veers towards economic questions whenever foreign investments are at stake. Wider Central Asia is thus caught between some ready-made formulas – the Heartland of the old continent where global and regional powers play out their Great Game – and discursive excesses that warn about the impending total chaos of failing states or its optimistic inverse, the revival of the Great Silk Road. This vision, however, is distant from realities on the ground, which are far more complex http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Central Asian Affairs Brill

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/editor-s-note-yb0mv5xvS1
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2014 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Editor’s Note
ISSN
2214-2282
eISSN
2214-2290
DOI
10.1163/22142290-00101002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This first issue of Central Asian Affairs comes out in spring 2014, at a time when Western pundits are venting their concerns about the withdrawal of international troops from Afghanistan and the possible chaos that might descend on Afghanistan and its neighbors as a result. They also complain about the sharply waning interest shown by policy decision-makers for this region of the world. This Cassandra-like view is undoubtedly a byproduct of the media world and of think-tank expertise relating to the wider Central Asian region, and has been part of their intellectual production for more than a decade. It leads to a purely utilitarian view of the region, revolving entirely around security issues, as well as to an alarmist narrative that veers towards economic questions whenever foreign investments are at stake. Wider Central Asia is thus caught between some ready-made formulas – the Heartland of the old continent where global and regional powers play out their Great Game – and discursive excesses that warn about the impending total chaos of failing states or its optimistic inverse, the revival of the Great Silk Road. This vision, however, is distant from realities on the ground, which are far more complex

Journal

Central Asian AffairsBrill

Published: Apr 18, 2014

There are no references for this article.