Editor's Introduction: Petitions and Denunciations in Russian and Soviet History1

Editor's Introduction: Petitions and Denunciations in Russian and Soviet History1 SHEILA FITZPATRICK (Chicago, U.S.A.) EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION: PETITIONS AND DENUNCIATIONS IN RUSSIAN AND SOVIET HISTORY1 Historians of prerevolutionary Russia, particularly Muscovy, have long been interested in petitions2 and denunciations.3 As far as the Soviet period is concerned, however, both these topics were comparatively neglected until re- cently.4 The only kind of Soviet letter that attracted much scholarly attention in the past was the letter to the editors These studies were necessarily based 1. Thanks to Jonathan Bone for research assistance in the preparation of this issue, Jenifer Stenfors for Russian typing, and Susan Jones for technical assistance. Matthew Lenoe also eontftbuted a great deal as graftt-coordintor and asmrnnteonference-organizer. For more ac- knowledgements in connection with the "Letters" conference, see note 32. 2. On Muscovite petitions, see Horace W. Dewey and Ann Marie Kleimola, "The Petition (Chelobitnaja) as an Old Russian Literary Genie," The Slavic and East European Journal 14 (1970): 284-301 and S. S. Volkov, Leksika russkikh chelobitnykh XVII veka. Formuliar, tradit- sionnye etiketnye i stilevye sredstva (Leningrad: Izd. Leningradskogo Universiteta, 1974). On petitions in the imperial era, see Gregory L. Freeze, From Supplication to Revolution: A Doc- umentary Social History of Imperial Russia (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 1988); http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian History Brill

Editor's Introduction: Petitions and Denunciations in Russian and Soviet History1

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1997 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0094-288X
eISSN
1876-3316
D.O.I.
10.1163/187633197X00014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SHEILA FITZPATRICK (Chicago, U.S.A.) EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION: PETITIONS AND DENUNCIATIONS IN RUSSIAN AND SOVIET HISTORY1 Historians of prerevolutionary Russia, particularly Muscovy, have long been interested in petitions2 and denunciations.3 As far as the Soviet period is concerned, however, both these topics were comparatively neglected until re- cently.4 The only kind of Soviet letter that attracted much scholarly attention in the past was the letter to the editors These studies were necessarily based 1. Thanks to Jonathan Bone for research assistance in the preparation of this issue, Jenifer Stenfors for Russian typing, and Susan Jones for technical assistance. Matthew Lenoe also eontftbuted a great deal as graftt-coordintor and asmrnnteonference-organizer. For more ac- knowledgements in connection with the "Letters" conference, see note 32. 2. On Muscovite petitions, see Horace W. Dewey and Ann Marie Kleimola, "The Petition (Chelobitnaja) as an Old Russian Literary Genie," The Slavic and East European Journal 14 (1970): 284-301 and S. S. Volkov, Leksika russkikh chelobitnykh XVII veka. Formuliar, tradit- sionnye etiketnye i stilevye sredstva (Leningrad: Izd. Leningradskogo Universiteta, 1974). On petitions in the imperial era, see Gregory L. Freeze, From Supplication to Revolution: A Doc- umentary Social History of Imperial Russia (Oxford: Oxford Univ. Press, 1988);

Journal

Russian HistoryBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1997

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