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Ecce Ego : How I Become What I Am

Ecce Ego : How I Become What I Am Jacob Rogozinski. The Ego and the Flesh: An Introduction to Egoanalysis . Translated by Robert Vallier. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2010. xiii + 352 pp. self-begot, self-rais’d By our own quick’ning power — John Milton , Paradise Lost “Everything is what it is, and not another thing”: Joseph Butler’s statement of this self-evident truth was deemed sufficiently important by G.E. Moore for him to use it as the epigraph to his groundbreaking 1903 book Principia Ethica . It could equally well, if not better, have served as an epigraph to Jacob Rogozinski’s no less groundbreaking The Ego and the Flesh , which appeared in French in 2006 as Le moi et la chair and is now available in Bob Vallier’s faithful translation. Butler made his remark in the context of observing that self-love and benevolence “are not to be opposed, but only to be distinguished.” 1 Against a widespread tendency to denigrate self-love and to extol pure benevolence—or, as we might say today, to denounce narcissism in favor of infinite obligation to the Other—Butler cautions that benevolence can be misguided and that most human folly and cruelty rest on a failure to cultivate self-love. Rogozinski could not agree http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Ecce Ego : How I Become What I Am

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 44 (3): 433 – Oct 9, 2014

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/15691640-12341297
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Jacob Rogozinski. The Ego and the Flesh: An Introduction to Egoanalysis . Translated by Robert Vallier. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2010. xiii + 352 pp. self-begot, self-rais’d By our own quick’ning power — John Milton , Paradise Lost “Everything is what it is, and not another thing”: Joseph Butler’s statement of this self-evident truth was deemed sufficiently important by G.E. Moore for him to use it as the epigraph to his groundbreaking 1903 book Principia Ethica . It could equally well, if not better, have served as an epigraph to Jacob Rogozinski’s no less groundbreaking The Ego and the Flesh , which appeared in French in 2006 as Le moi et la chair and is now available in Bob Vallier’s faithful translation. Butler made his remark in the context of observing that self-love and benevolence “are not to be opposed, but only to be distinguished.” 1 Against a widespread tendency to denigrate self-love and to extol pure benevolence—or, as we might say today, to denounce narcissism in favor of infinite obligation to the Other—Butler cautions that benevolence can be misguided and that most human folly and cruelty rest on a failure to cultivate self-love. Rogozinski could not agree

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Oct 9, 2014

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