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EARLY TIBETAN CLAY SCULPTURE

EARLY TIBETAN CLAY SCULPTURE Christian Luczanits1 Tibetan art can be viewed and remembered in many different ways. For the traveller who has visited one of the regions of Tibetan culture, Tibetan art may signify the colourful interiors of the monasteries he or she has visited with sculptures of different sizes, walls covered with murals and practically every corner of the structure decorated in some form, an interior that contrasts markedly with the soft tones of the high altitude desert landscape outside. The collector will tend to think of the colourful scroll paintings or thangkas, and dazzling bronze sculptures of different ages and quality offered by auction houses and art dealers all over the world. The visitor to a museum may also think of everyday products of skilled craftsmanship and often somewhat crude appearance found in many museum collections in addition to thangkas and bronzes. All of them will certainly also have some of the aspects in mind that are so strange to a western beholder with a Christian background, in particular the fierce deities, often with multiple heads - some of them animal heads - arms and legs, or those in sexual embrace, the so-called father-mother (Tib. yab-yum) images. Few people, however, will http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aziatische Kunst Brill

EARLY TIBETAN CLAY SCULPTURE

Aziatische Kunst , Volume 33 (3): 14 – Jul 5, 2003

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
eISSN
2543-1749
DOI
10.1163/25431749-90000011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Christian Luczanits1 Tibetan art can be viewed and remembered in many different ways. For the traveller who has visited one of the regions of Tibetan culture, Tibetan art may signify the colourful interiors of the monasteries he or she has visited with sculptures of different sizes, walls covered with murals and practically every corner of the structure decorated in some form, an interior that contrasts markedly with the soft tones of the high altitude desert landscape outside. The collector will tend to think of the colourful scroll paintings or thangkas, and dazzling bronze sculptures of different ages and quality offered by auction houses and art dealers all over the world. The visitor to a museum may also think of everyday products of skilled craftsmanship and often somewhat crude appearance found in many museum collections in addition to thangkas and bronzes. All of them will certainly also have some of the aspects in mind that are so strange to a western beholder with a Christian background, in particular the fierce deities, often with multiple heads - some of them animal heads - arms and legs, or those in sexual embrace, the so-called father-mother (Tib. yab-yum) images. Few people, however, will

Journal

Aziatische KunstBrill

Published: Jul 5, 2003

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