Dynamics of Ethnic Identity Among the Siddis of Hyderabad

Dynamics of Ethnic Identity Among the Siddis of Hyderabad African and Asian Studies 6 (2007) 321-345 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2007 DOI: 10.1163/156920907X212268 www.brill.nl/aas African and Asian Studies A A S Dynamics of Ethnic Identity Among the Siddis of Hyderabad Ababu Minda Yimene Max-Planck Institute for Social Anthropology, Advokatenweg 36, 06114 Halle/Saale, Germany E-mail: yimene@eth.mpg.de Abstract Th e existing commercial contact between India and Africa since prehistoric times grew substan- tially since the rise of Islam in the 7th century, leaped to its climax during the middle ages and continued until the second half of the 20th century. Th is commercial relationship involved the trade in humans from Africa to Asia. Many African war captives were sold as slaves in India to serve as domestics and infantries among the aristocracy of rising Islamic kingdoms while some emigrated by free will and settled in India engaging in various occupations. Descendants of African slaves and immigrants, who are locally known as Siddis, presently live in various geo- graphical pockets of India forming their own ethnic enclaves amidst their host societies. Th e main Siddi communities in India are located in Gujarat, Hyderabad, Karnataka, in the Bombay region and along the western coast, including Goa. Th e Siddis of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African and Asian Studies Brill

Dynamics of Ethnic Identity Among the Siddis of Hyderabad

African and Asian Studies, Volume 6 (3): 321 – Jan 1, 2007

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2007 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1569-2094
eISSN
1569-2108
DOI
10.1163/156920907X212268
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

African and Asian Studies 6 (2007) 321-345 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2007 DOI: 10.1163/156920907X212268 www.brill.nl/aas African and Asian Studies A A S Dynamics of Ethnic Identity Among the Siddis of Hyderabad Ababu Minda Yimene Max-Planck Institute for Social Anthropology, Advokatenweg 36, 06114 Halle/Saale, Germany E-mail: yimene@eth.mpg.de Abstract Th e existing commercial contact between India and Africa since prehistoric times grew substan- tially since the rise of Islam in the 7th century, leaped to its climax during the middle ages and continued until the second half of the 20th century. Th is commercial relationship involved the trade in humans from Africa to Asia. Many African war captives were sold as slaves in India to serve as domestics and infantries among the aristocracy of rising Islamic kingdoms while some emigrated by free will and settled in India engaging in various occupations. Descendants of African slaves and immigrants, who are locally known as Siddis, presently live in various geo- graphical pockets of India forming their own ethnic enclaves amidst their host societies. Th e main Siddi communities in India are located in Gujarat, Hyderabad, Karnataka, in the Bombay region and along the western coast, including Goa. Th e Siddis of

Journal

African and Asian StudiesBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2007

Keywords: HABSHI; MIGRATION; SIDDI; IDENTITY; ETHNICITY; AFRO-INDIANS

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