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Doing Good Better: Effective Altruism and a Radical New Way to Make a Difference. By William MacAskill. London: Guardian Books, 2015.

Doing Good Better: Effective Altruism and a Radical New Way to Make a Difference. By William... Global Governance 22 (2016), 327–328 BOOK REVIEWS How Change Happens. By Duncan Green. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Suppose you want to change the world. Where should you start? Duncan Green does not offer a road map for changing the world—indeed, he rejects the idea that simple plans can be made for how to make the world more just. How Change Happens is Green’s attempt “to make some sense out of the many things I have done, seen, read, talked about, and thought about for decades” (p. 257) as an activist and researcher, most recently at Oxfam. Green makes power and systems thinking central to his analysis of how people can bring about social progress. Readers of this journal will be par- ticularly interested in Chapter 7, on the international system, and Chapter 8, on transnational corporations. Green rightly identifies both multilateral institutions and transnational corporations as potential agents for progres- sive change and obstacles to more rapid global progress. He sees the role of the activist to push these institutions, especially those whose sources of power rely on citizen or consumer support, to better protect human rights and promote human progress. Activists may partner with or directly chal- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Doing Good Better: Effective Altruism and a Radical New Way to Make a Difference. By William MacAskill. London: Guardian Books, 2015.

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-02302012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 22 (2016), 327–328 BOOK REVIEWS How Change Happens. By Duncan Green. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Suppose you want to change the world. Where should you start? Duncan Green does not offer a road map for changing the world—indeed, he rejects the idea that simple plans can be made for how to make the world more just. How Change Happens is Green’s attempt “to make some sense out of the many things I have done, seen, read, talked about, and thought about for decades” (p. 257) as an activist and researcher, most recently at Oxfam. Green makes power and systems thinking central to his analysis of how people can bring about social progress. Readers of this journal will be par- ticularly interested in Chapter 7, on the international system, and Chapter 8, on transnational corporations. Green rightly identifies both multilateral institutions and transnational corporations as potential agents for progres- sive change and obstacles to more rapid global progress. He sees the role of the activist to push these institutions, especially those whose sources of power rely on citizen or consumer support, to better protect human rights and promote human progress. Activists may partner with or directly chal-

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 19, 2017

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