Division of labour within cooperatively breeding groups

Division of labour within cooperatively breeding groups Division of labour within cooperatively breeding groups Kathryn E. Arnold 1,2) , Ian P.F. Owens 3) & Anne W. Goldizen 4) ( 1 Division of Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, Institute of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK; 3 Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park, Ascot, Berkshire SL5 7PY, UK; 4 Department of Zoology and Entomology, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia) (Accepted: 25 July 2005) Summary Within cooperative societies, group members share in caring for offspring. Although division of labour among group members has been relatively well studied in insects, less is known about vertebrates. Most studies of avian helping focus solely on the extent to which helpers provision the offspring, however, helpers can participate in everything from nest building to predator defence. Bad provisioners may, for example, not be as ‘uncooperative’ as they ap- pear, if they are good defenders. Thus, the distribution of helping tasks between group mem- bers should have important implications for our interpretation of group dynamics. Here, we compare two distinct forms of helping behaviour in the cooperatively breeding noisy miner ( Manorina melanocephala ): chick provisioning and mobbing nest predators. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Division of labour within cooperatively breeding groups

Behaviour, Volume 142 (11-12): 1577 – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2005 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853905774831927
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Division of labour within cooperatively breeding groups Kathryn E. Arnold 1,2) , Ian P.F. Owens 3) & Anne W. Goldizen 4) ( 1 Division of Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, Institute of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK; 3 Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park, Ascot, Berkshire SL5 7PY, UK; 4 Department of Zoology and Entomology, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia) (Accepted: 25 July 2005) Summary Within cooperative societies, group members share in caring for offspring. Although division of labour among group members has been relatively well studied in insects, less is known about vertebrates. Most studies of avian helping focus solely on the extent to which helpers provision the offspring, however, helpers can participate in everything from nest building to predator defence. Bad provisioners may, for example, not be as ‘uncooperative’ as they ap- pear, if they are good defenders. Thus, the distribution of helping tasks between group mem- bers should have important implications for our interpretation of group dynamics. Here, we compare two distinct forms of helping behaviour in the cooperatively breeding noisy miner ( Manorina melanocephala ): chick provisioning and mobbing nest predators.

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2005

Keywords: BEHAVIOURAL SYNDROMES; PROVISIONING; COOPERATIVE BREEDING; DIVISION OF LABOUR; MOBBING

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