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Discussion

Discussion 95 Discussion DANIEL LIBESKIND: I have to say that I have seldom had a response so moving, because the thought which followed was both critical and at the same time on the set of invisible zigzags that are my own concerns. I have to admit I do not know of the book you mentioned. At the same time, I must be very honest and say that it would be very difficult for me to answer these questions systematically or pedagogically, as you have requested. You have raised the most difficult questions, which risk going too far into a realm that is at once so close to architecture and yet made impossibly far-the political arena. And yet, in my view, this risk is the energetic or vital activity of someone who would dare to call themselves an architect today. I must say frankly that I did not say only rhetorically that I am not a "normal" architect-I do not fall into that category anyway, not simply by will, but through my project; it is not that I cannot do it or that I would like to be an architect, but I cannot think that way. And I think-to answer http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Discussion

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 22 (1): 95 – Jan 1, 1992

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1992 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916492X00106
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

95 Discussion DANIEL LIBESKIND: I have to say that I have seldom had a response so moving, because the thought which followed was both critical and at the same time on the set of invisible zigzags that are my own concerns. I have to admit I do not know of the book you mentioned. At the same time, I must be very honest and say that it would be very difficult for me to answer these questions systematically or pedagogically, as you have requested. You have raised the most difficult questions, which risk going too far into a realm that is at once so close to architecture and yet made impossibly far-the political arena. And yet, in my view, this risk is the energetic or vital activity of someone who would dare to call themselves an architect today. I must say frankly that I did not say only rhetorically that I am not a "normal" architect-I do not fall into that category anyway, not simply by will, but through my project; it is not that I cannot do it or that I would like to be an architect, but I cannot think that way. And I think-to answer

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1992

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