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Disadvantaged Minorities in Self-Employment

Disadvantaged Minorities in Self-Employment Disadvantaged Minorities in Self-Employment IVAN LIGHT University of California, Los Angeles, U.S.A. TWO GENERATIONS of social scientists have described self-employ- ment as an economic anachronism in the process of disappearance (Lynd and Lynd 1937: 69; Mayer 1947; Vidich and Bensman 1960: 305-306; Castles and Kosack 1973: 465; Weber 1947: 427). Following Marx on this point, they observed that urbanization and the concentration of firms into ever larger units has continuously reduced the once numerous class of free enterprisers in the last century (Corey 1964: 371 ) . Indeed, a quarter-century ago, Mills (1951 ; see Light 1974) traced the numerical decline of agricultural and non-agricul- tural self-employment in the United States between 1870 and 1940. When Mills wrote, this lengthy decline had already transformed an eighteenth-century nation of farmers and artisans into a nation of wage-earners. Since Mills, the decline of self-employment has unambiguously continued (Ray, 1975). In 1973, a slim majority of American farmers continued to be self-employed, but only 6.7 percent of non-farm workers were. Given these trends, the presumptive odds against self-employment are poorer now than ever in the past, and its rewards are meager. On the average, self-employed men earn as much as wage-earners, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology) Brill

Disadvantaged Minorities in Self-Employment

International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology) , Volume 20 (1-2): 31 – Jan 1, 1979

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1979 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0020-7152
eISSN
1745-2554
DOI
10.1163/156854279X00157
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Disadvantaged Minorities in Self-Employment IVAN LIGHT University of California, Los Angeles, U.S.A. TWO GENERATIONS of social scientists have described self-employ- ment as an economic anachronism in the process of disappearance (Lynd and Lynd 1937: 69; Mayer 1947; Vidich and Bensman 1960: 305-306; Castles and Kosack 1973: 465; Weber 1947: 427). Following Marx on this point, they observed that urbanization and the concentration of firms into ever larger units has continuously reduced the once numerous class of free enterprisers in the last century (Corey 1964: 371 ) . Indeed, a quarter-century ago, Mills (1951 ; see Light 1974) traced the numerical decline of agricultural and non-agricul- tural self-employment in the United States between 1870 and 1940. When Mills wrote, this lengthy decline had already transformed an eighteenth-century nation of farmers and artisans into a nation of wage-earners. Since Mills, the decline of self-employment has unambiguously continued (Ray, 1975). In 1973, a slim majority of American farmers continued to be self-employed, but only 6.7 percent of non-farm workers were. Given these trends, the presumptive odds against self-employment are poorer now than ever in the past, and its rewards are meager. On the average, self-employed men earn as much as wage-earners,

Journal

International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1979

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