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"Dirty Work": Gurwitsch on the Phenomenological Theory of Science and Constitutive Phenomenology

"Dirty Work": Gurwitsch on the Phenomenological Theory of Science and Constitutive Phenomenology 191 "Dirty Work": Gurwitsch on the Phenomenological Theory of Science and Constitutive Phenomenology Aron Gurwitsch. Phenomenology and the Theory of Science, ed. Lester Embree, Northwestern University Press, Evanston, 1974. 267 pages. But, Socrates, said Simmias, where shall we find a magician who understands these spells now that you are leaving us? Phaedo, 78a For Husserlian phenomenology the theory of science is not an after- thought, nor is it merely tangential to the central concerns of the philoso- phical reflection on the way things present themselves to us. The modern scientific interpretation of nature since the time of Galileo has colored our everyday interpretation of the world to the extent that it has become dif- ficult, if not almost impossible, to separate this interpretive scheme from the content of our concrete lived experience. The mathematization and algebraization of nature have had both a resounding success during the past four centuries and a profound effect both upon the way we think of "knowledge" in the strict sense (episteme), and upon the methods we use to discover and certify such knowledge. As an attempt to render understand- able the notion of objectivity, phenomenology must perforce concern it- self with the dominant http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

"Dirty Work": Gurwitsch on the Phenomenological Theory of Science and Constitutive Phenomenology

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 6 (1): 191 – Jan 1, 1976

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1976 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916476X00104
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

191 "Dirty Work": Gurwitsch on the Phenomenological Theory of Science and Constitutive Phenomenology Aron Gurwitsch. Phenomenology and the Theory of Science, ed. Lester Embree, Northwestern University Press, Evanston, 1974. 267 pages. But, Socrates, said Simmias, where shall we find a magician who understands these spells now that you are leaving us? Phaedo, 78a For Husserlian phenomenology the theory of science is not an after- thought, nor is it merely tangential to the central concerns of the philoso- phical reflection on the way things present themselves to us. The modern scientific interpretation of nature since the time of Galileo has colored our everyday interpretation of the world to the extent that it has become dif- ficult, if not almost impossible, to separate this interpretive scheme from the content of our concrete lived experience. The mathematization and algebraization of nature have had both a resounding success during the past four centuries and a profound effect both upon the way we think of "knowledge" in the strict sense (episteme), and upon the methods we use to discover and certify such knowledge. As an attempt to render understand- able the notion of objectivity, phenomenology must perforce concern it- self with the dominant

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1976

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