Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Dewey’s Public

Dewey’s Public question of defining the origins or ends of the state in general, and toward the more concrete question of what specific purposes the state has served in different historical contexts. His answer to this question, simply put, is that every state ­ or, more precisely, every political institution, whether it is called a "state" or not1 ­ exists in order to solve the problems of some public, where a public is defined as "all those who are affected by the indirect consequences of [social] transactions to such an extent that it is deemed necessary to have those consequences systematically cared for" (245­246). A given state takes the form that it does because of the nature of the problems that it was designed to solve, and it will change its form ­ though usually only gradually, belatedly, and in a piecemeal fashion ­ if and when it is asked to solve a different set of problems. It follows, Dewey argues, that the sources of political change are not to be found in the realm of politics itself, but rather in the extra-political realm of voluntary association among human beings, where political problems are generated and become salient in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Pragmatism Brill

Dewey’s Public

Contemporary Pragmatism , Volume 7 (1): 31 – Apr 21, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/dewey-s-public-zTfREagolR
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2010 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3429
eISSN
1875-8185
DOI
10.1163/18758185-90000154
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

question of defining the origins or ends of the state in general, and toward the more concrete question of what specific purposes the state has served in different historical contexts. His answer to this question, simply put, is that every state ­ or, more precisely, every political institution, whether it is called a "state" or not1 ­ exists in order to solve the problems of some public, where a public is defined as "all those who are affected by the indirect consequences of [social] transactions to such an extent that it is deemed necessary to have those consequences systematically cared for" (245­246). A given state takes the form that it does because of the nature of the problems that it was designed to solve, and it will change its form ­ though usually only gradually, belatedly, and in a piecemeal fashion ­ if and when it is asked to solve a different set of problems. It follows, Dewey argues, that the sources of political change are not to be found in the realm of politics itself, but rather in the extra-political realm of voluntary association among human beings, where political problems are generated and become salient in the

Journal

Contemporary PragmatismBrill

Published: Apr 21, 2010

There are no references for this article.