Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Dewey and Hayek on Democratic Experimentalism

Dewey and Hayek on Democratic Experimentalism Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 9, No. 2 (December 2012), 93­116 Editions Rodopi ©2012 Shane J. Ralston Michael Dorf and Charles Sabel invoke John Dewey's "pragmatist account of thought and action" as the "backdrop" for their theory of democratic experimentalism, an approach to governance emphasizing judicially monitored local decision making within a system of decentralized administrative authority. Little credit for influence is given to the Austrian economist Friedrich Hayek and his classic liberal ideas. Indeed, Sabel has been highly critical of Hayek's ideas. Yet, an argument can be made that (i) democratic experimentalism is at least loosely Hayekian and (ii) a combined Deweyan-Hayekian analysis of Dorf and Sabel's theory reveals some critical mistakes. Dewey and Hayek's ideas are more compatible than most democratic theorists and political philosophers will admit, allowing the creation and evaluation of democratic experiments within a DeweyanHayekian theoretical framework, as well as extending the framework to other areas of political inquiry. ...for Dewey, it [democracy] was a method for identifying and correcting through public debate and action the unintended consequences of coordination among private actors. He was concerned to know what democracy, so understood, could learn from the methods of public scrutiny and experimentation by which science http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Pragmatism Brill

Dewey and Hayek on Democratic Experimentalism

Contemporary Pragmatism , Volume 9 (2): 93 – Apr 21, 2012

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/dewey-and-hayek-on-democratic-experimentalism-ofsTGzbT4b
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2012 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3429
eISSN
1875-8185
DOI
10.1163/18758185-90000232
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 9, No. 2 (December 2012), 93­116 Editions Rodopi ©2012 Shane J. Ralston Michael Dorf and Charles Sabel invoke John Dewey's "pragmatist account of thought and action" as the "backdrop" for their theory of democratic experimentalism, an approach to governance emphasizing judicially monitored local decision making within a system of decentralized administrative authority. Little credit for influence is given to the Austrian economist Friedrich Hayek and his classic liberal ideas. Indeed, Sabel has been highly critical of Hayek's ideas. Yet, an argument can be made that (i) democratic experimentalism is at least loosely Hayekian and (ii) a combined Deweyan-Hayekian analysis of Dorf and Sabel's theory reveals some critical mistakes. Dewey and Hayek's ideas are more compatible than most democratic theorists and political philosophers will admit, allowing the creation and evaluation of democratic experiments within a DeweyanHayekian theoretical framework, as well as extending the framework to other areas of political inquiry. ...for Dewey, it [democracy] was a method for identifying and correcting through public debate and action the unintended consequences of coordination among private actors. He was concerned to know what democracy, so understood, could learn from the methods of public scrutiny and experimentation by which science

Journal

Contemporary PragmatismBrill

Published: Apr 21, 2012

There are no references for this article.