Demography and the Evolution of Cooperative Breeding in the Bicolored Wren, Campylorhynchus Griseus

Demography and the Evolution of Cooperative Breeding in the Bicolored Wren, Campylorhynchus Griseus DEMOGRAPHY AND THE EVOLUTION OF COOPERATIVE BREEDING IN THE BICOLORED WREN, CAMPYLORHYNCHUS GRISEUS by STEVEN N. AUSTAD1)2) and KERRY N. RABENOLD (Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, U.S.A.) (With 2 Figures) (Acc. 9-X-1985) Introduction In spite of the large number of theories advanced, and the great mass of field data gathered, on a wide variety of cooperatively breeding birds, the reasons that nonbreeding adults help others rear their young are not fully agreed upon (SELANDER, 1964; BROWN, 1969, 1974, 1978, 1982; BROWN & BROWN, 1984; WOOLFENDEN & FITZPATRICK, 1978; VEHRENCAMP, 1979; GOWATY, 1981; KOENIG & PITELKA, 1981; EMLEN, 1982a, b; LIGON, 1983; WILEY & RABENOLD, 1984). One recurring notion is that ecological limitations prevent some maturing birds from finding suitable conditions for breeding independently, and therefore they remain in their natal ter- ritory until the opportunity to breed arises (SELANDER, 1964; BROWN, 1969, 1974; KOENIG & PITELKA, 1981; EMLEN, 1982a). The most common limitation adduced is a shortage of breeding territories, and the habitat is said to be "saturated" when availability of breeding territories limits population growth. There are at least two reasons why this hypothesis by itself is incomplete. First, although the hypothesis http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Demography and the Evolution of Cooperative Breeding in the Bicolored Wren, Campylorhynchus Griseus

Behaviour, Volume 97 (3-4): 308 – Jan 1, 1986

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1986 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853986X00667
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DEMOGRAPHY AND THE EVOLUTION OF COOPERATIVE BREEDING IN THE BICOLORED WREN, CAMPYLORHYNCHUS GRISEUS by STEVEN N. AUSTAD1)2) and KERRY N. RABENOLD (Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, U.S.A.) (With 2 Figures) (Acc. 9-X-1985) Introduction In spite of the large number of theories advanced, and the great mass of field data gathered, on a wide variety of cooperatively breeding birds, the reasons that nonbreeding adults help others rear their young are not fully agreed upon (SELANDER, 1964; BROWN, 1969, 1974, 1978, 1982; BROWN & BROWN, 1984; WOOLFENDEN & FITZPATRICK, 1978; VEHRENCAMP, 1979; GOWATY, 1981; KOENIG & PITELKA, 1981; EMLEN, 1982a, b; LIGON, 1983; WILEY & RABENOLD, 1984). One recurring notion is that ecological limitations prevent some maturing birds from finding suitable conditions for breeding independently, and therefore they remain in their natal ter- ritory until the opportunity to breed arises (SELANDER, 1964; BROWN, 1969, 1974; KOENIG & PITELKA, 1981; EMLEN, 1982a). The most common limitation adduced is a shortage of breeding territories, and the habitat is said to be "saturated" when availability of breeding territories limits population growth. There are at least two reasons why this hypothesis by itself is incomplete. First, although the hypothesis

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1986

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