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De Novis Libris Iudicia

De Novis Libris Iudicia DE NOVIS LIBRIS IUDICIA K. M. T. CHRIMES, Ancient Sparta. A re-examination of the evidence. Manchester University Press 1949. Pr. 45/-. "There is so much uncertainty in the accounts which historians left us of Lycurgus, that scarcely anything is asserted by one of them which is not called into question or contradicted by the rest". These words of Plutarch (Lyc. 1) on the lawgiver of Sparta might be applied equally well to all historians of ancient Sparta. Mrs Chrimes Atkinson's work therefore will undoubtedly become the object of lively discussions, and opinions will widely differ on the value of her re-examination. But in the future even the most sceptical scholar will not be able to avoid reading this remarkable book and weighing carefully the sometimes original and bold conclusions drawn by the author from the hopelessly scanty material. With great success two dogmas of all modern historiography on Sparta have been undermined : according to the first Sparta's decline began in the end of the sixth century B.C.; the second would have us believe that the conquest of Messenia involved Sparta in the necessity for complete political and social reorganisation, the eunomia. I am convinced that thanks to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mnemosyne Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1951 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0026-7074
eISSN
1568-525X
DOI
10.1163/156852551X00200
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DE NOVIS LIBRIS IUDICIA K. M. T. CHRIMES, Ancient Sparta. A re-examination of the evidence. Manchester University Press 1949. Pr. 45/-. "There is so much uncertainty in the accounts which historians left us of Lycurgus, that scarcely anything is asserted by one of them which is not called into question or contradicted by the rest". These words of Plutarch (Lyc. 1) on the lawgiver of Sparta might be applied equally well to all historians of ancient Sparta. Mrs Chrimes Atkinson's work therefore will undoubtedly become the object of lively discussions, and opinions will widely differ on the value of her re-examination. But in the future even the most sceptical scholar will not be able to avoid reading this remarkable book and weighing carefully the sometimes original and bold conclusions drawn by the author from the hopelessly scanty material. With great success two dogmas of all modern historiography on Sparta have been undermined : according to the first Sparta's decline began in the end of the sixth century B.C.; the second would have us believe that the conquest of Messenia involved Sparta in the necessity for complete political and social reorganisation, the eunomia. I am convinced that thanks to

Journal

MnemosyneBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1951

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