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Das Schicksal Priszillians und seiner Anhänger 380 in Saragossa, 384 in Bordeaux und 385 in Trier

Das Schicksal Priszillians und seiner Anhänger 380 in Saragossa, 384 in Bordeaux und 385 in Trier AbstractPriscillian and some of his followers were victims of synodal and state process procedures in which bishops acted as prosecutors and supporters of the death penalty imposed at Trier. The accusation was that the Priscillians were heretics (Manichaeans) and practiced maleficium, i.e. sorcery, both prohibited by law. The source situation to this already in late antiquity often as scandalous condemned case – among others by the bishops of Tours, Milan and Rome –, is very insufficient for important details. In particular, there are very few texts which can be satisfactorily evaluated for the question of conciliar majorities and minorities and possibly controversial debates. Nevertheless, with the help of the writings of Priscillian and Sulpicius Severus, it is possible at least to reconstruct with some degree of reliability the interaction between ecclesiastical and state jurisdiction, as it was largely regulated by canons and imperial laws. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annuarium Historiae Conciliorum Brill

Das Schicksal Priszillians und seiner Anhänger 380 in Saragossa, 384 in Bordeaux und 385 in Trier

Annuarium Historiae Conciliorum , Volume 49 (1): 28 – Apr 28, 2020

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0003-5157
eISSN
2589-0433
DOI
10.30965/25890433-04901003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractPriscillian and some of his followers were victims of synodal and state process procedures in which bishops acted as prosecutors and supporters of the death penalty imposed at Trier. The accusation was that the Priscillians were heretics (Manichaeans) and practiced maleficium, i.e. sorcery, both prohibited by law. The source situation to this already in late antiquity often as scandalous condemned case – among others by the bishops of Tours, Milan and Rome –, is very insufficient for important details. In particular, there are very few texts which can be satisfactorily evaluated for the question of conciliar majorities and minorities and possibly controversial debates. Nevertheless, with the help of the writings of Priscillian and Sulpicius Severus, it is possible at least to reconstruct with some degree of reliability the interaction between ecclesiastical and state jurisdiction, as it was largely regulated by canons and imperial laws.

Journal

Annuarium Historiae ConciliorumBrill

Published: Apr 28, 2020

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