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Das Ding: Lacan and Levinas1

Das Ding: Lacan and Levinas1 72 Das Ding: Lacan and Levinas1 SIMON CRITCHLEY University of Essex The Ethics of the Real In Seminar VII, The Ethics of Psychoanalysis (1959-60), Lacan's thesis is that the ethical as such is articulated in relation to the order of the real, which is variously and obscurely glossed as "that which resists, the impossible, that which always comes back to the same place, the limit of all symbolization, etc. etc." Indeed this thesis is finessed in the fol- lowing, crucial way: namely, that the ethical, which affirms itself in opposition to pleasure (hence Lacan's linking of the reality principle and the death drive, of Freud's very early and very late work, insofar as both are articulating what is opposed to or beyond the pleasure principle), is articulated in relation to the real insofar as the latter can be the guarantor of what Lacan calls, following a certain idiosyn- cratic and radical reading of Freud, das Ding, la Chose, the Thing.2 The whole thematic of das Ding, which, it would seem, only appears in Seminar VII (although what is named by das Ding might be said to be replaced later in Lacan's work in the guise of the "objet http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Das Ding: Lacan and Levinas1

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 28 (1): 72 – Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1998 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916498X00056
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

72 Das Ding: Lacan and Levinas1 SIMON CRITCHLEY University of Essex The Ethics of the Real In Seminar VII, The Ethics of Psychoanalysis (1959-60), Lacan's thesis is that the ethical as such is articulated in relation to the order of the real, which is variously and obscurely glossed as "that which resists, the impossible, that which always comes back to the same place, the limit of all symbolization, etc. etc." Indeed this thesis is finessed in the fol- lowing, crucial way: namely, that the ethical, which affirms itself in opposition to pleasure (hence Lacan's linking of the reality principle and the death drive, of Freud's very early and very late work, insofar as both are articulating what is opposed to or beyond the pleasure principle), is articulated in relation to the real insofar as the latter can be the guarantor of what Lacan calls, following a certain idiosyn- cratic and radical reading of Freud, das Ding, la Chose, the Thing.2 The whole thematic of das Ding, which, it would seem, only appears in Seminar VII (although what is named by das Ding might be said to be replaced later in Lacan's work in the guise of the "objet

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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