Crayfish predation on amphibian eggs and larvae

Crayfish predation on amphibian eggs and larvae Crayfish predation on amphibian eggs and larvae Eva Axelsson, Per Nyström, Johan Sidenmark, Christer Brönmark Department of Ecology, University of Lund, S-223 62 Lund, Sweden e-mail: Per.Nystrom@limnol.lu.se Abstract. We experimentally evaluated the impact of the introduced signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) and the native noble crayfish (Astacus astacus) on eggs and larvae of seven species of amphibians, likely to co-occur with crayfish in southern Sweden. In aquarium experiments eggs and tadpoles of all amphibian species were consumed by both crayfish species. The consumption of amphibian eggs by signal crayfish increased with temperature. The noble crayfish consumed more tadpoles than the signal crayfish, but the latter caused more sub-lethal damage to tadpoles. Tadpoles of the common toad (Bufo bufo) were sometimes killed but left uneaten by both crayfish species. In pool experiments, signal crayfish consumed more tadpoles of Hyla arborea in a less complex habitat and significantly reduced survival of Hyla tadpoles and the biomass of aquatic macrophytes. Introduction Recent reports have suggested a global decline in amphibian populations (Blaustein et al., 1994a; Sarkar, 1996) and several species of amphibians are declining in Sweden and other parts of Europe (Corbett, 1989). There is little evidence for a single factor causing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Amphibia-Reptilia Brill

Crayfish predation on amphibian eggs and larvae

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1997 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0173-5373
eISSN
1568-5381
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853897X00107
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Crayfish predation on amphibian eggs and larvae Eva Axelsson, Per Nyström, Johan Sidenmark, Christer Brönmark Department of Ecology, University of Lund, S-223 62 Lund, Sweden e-mail: Per.Nystrom@limnol.lu.se Abstract. We experimentally evaluated the impact of the introduced signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) and the native noble crayfish (Astacus astacus) on eggs and larvae of seven species of amphibians, likely to co-occur with crayfish in southern Sweden. In aquarium experiments eggs and tadpoles of all amphibian species were consumed by both crayfish species. The consumption of amphibian eggs by signal crayfish increased with temperature. The noble crayfish consumed more tadpoles than the signal crayfish, but the latter caused more sub-lethal damage to tadpoles. Tadpoles of the common toad (Bufo bufo) were sometimes killed but left uneaten by both crayfish species. In pool experiments, signal crayfish consumed more tadpoles of Hyla arborea in a less complex habitat and significantly reduced survival of Hyla tadpoles and the biomass of aquatic macrophytes. Introduction Recent reports have suggested a global decline in amphibian populations (Blaustein et al., 1994a; Sarkar, 1996) and several species of amphibians are declining in Sweden and other parts of Europe (Corbett, 1989). There is little evidence for a single factor causing

Journal

Amphibia-ReptiliaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1997

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