Craugastor escoces (Anura: Craugastoridae) reappears after 30 years: rediscovery of an “extinct” Neotropical frog

Craugastor escoces (Anura: Craugastoridae) reappears after 30 years: rediscovery of an... We report the rediscovery of a declared extinct frog, Craugastor escoces, at the edge of a protected forest in the Juan Castro Blanco National Park, Alajuela, Costa Rica. This species, which is endemic to Costa Rica, had not been observed since 1986. The rediscovery of this species comes after 30 years without being seen and 12 years of being declared extinct. The site where we found the species is located in the west of the central mountain region of Costa Rica, which is >15 km away from its known distribution. Our finding adds another species to the list of the few rediscovered frogs declared extinct. Knowing that C. escoces can still be found triggers the need for conservation strategies to help the species survive. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Amphibia-Reptilia Brill

Craugastor escoces (Anura: Craugastoridae) reappears after 30 years: rediscovery of an “extinct” Neotropical frog

Amphibia-Reptilia, Volume 38 (2): 3 – Mar 24, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/craugastor-escoces-anura-craugastoridae-reappears-after-30-years-hpy7yRpbhZ
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0173-5373
eISSN
1568-5381
D.O.I.
10.1163/15685381-00003102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We report the rediscovery of a declared extinct frog, Craugastor escoces, at the edge of a protected forest in the Juan Castro Blanco National Park, Alajuela, Costa Rica. This species, which is endemic to Costa Rica, had not been observed since 1986. The rediscovery of this species comes after 30 years without being seen and 12 years of being declared extinct. The site where we found the species is located in the west of the central mountain region of Costa Rica, which is >15 km away from its known distribution. Our finding adds another species to the list of the few rediscovered frogs declared extinct. Knowing that C. escoces can still be found triggers the need for conservation strategies to help the species survive.

Journal

Amphibia-ReptiliaBrill

Published: Mar 24, 2017

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off