Corrigenda & Addenda

Corrigenda & Addenda 356 CORRIGENDA & ADDENDA p. 304 line 12 a painted a warm dark red read a tier painted a purplish red p. 305 line 12 some clues read more clues p. 309 line 1 ad the standing semicircle: This shape comes much closer to the stoloi on Roman Republican coins of the "prora" group than to the ones on Macedonian coins of Antigonos Gonatas, Demetrios Poliorketes, or Antigonos Doson where such headplates or volutes are missing. p. 316 line 6 (Fig. I ) read (Fig. 1 ; 2,1-2) p. 318 line 29 (Fig. 2,5) read (Fig. 2,4) p. 320 footnote 57: On the other hand, the Punic ship from near Marsala (Frost et al. 1976/1980) had her pantry below the deck. p. 321 1 ad Warships in the Yellow tier, first paragraph: For the reason of the markedly different quality of both images, I had taken N 3 to have been a later addition to "Isis", which . was so to speak inspired by her model. The Hermitage exhibition in 1999 gave me my first chance to study both images together, making me agree that they have been executed as a unit, as the sgrafJito execution of N 3 suggests. So another explanation had to be found for the utterly crude drawing of the three-pronged ram, fitted to a round stempost as on "Isis" 61. N 3 so appears to be the intentionally caricaturish derogation of a vanquished foe fleeing from "Isis" with her mast standing but without her oars being shown in action. p. 329 line 9 without a rising bow read without rising at the bow " " line 20 C,10. read 7,10. p. 334 last line Fig. E,1.3.5 read Fig. 9,1.3.5 p. 336 ad first paragraph: In some Roman reliefs the raking foremast (artemo) is so stout as almost to be confounded with a raised boarding-bridge, but its round cross-section is clearly shown, and in the "Torlonia relief' of the 2nd century AD the foremast is being used as a derrick for holding a gangplank with a stevedore. " " ad footnote 80: Such a device seems to be shown in the graffito of a warship from Delos, but if the interpretation is correct, the graffito would postdate the known lifespan of the "raven" which seems to have been limited to the first Punic War. p. 345 line 9 Fig. C,7 read Fig. 7,7 ADDENDUM The Nymphaion Exhibition at the State Hermitage of St. Petersburg in the spring of 1999 gave me a chance of studying sgraffitti of "Isis" and N 3 in the context of the Back Wall. The first observation is due to the Hermitage's restoration team, and was brought to my know- ledge by D.E. ?istov: some thin lines have not been scratched into the brittle stucco but impressed into the stucco when still soft. In several places the yellow surface is preserved within these narrow grooves. I in 1993 had observed the same phenomenon in the Red Tier. It so is obvious that the decoration of both tiers had started simultaneously within a few hours from the application of the coloured stucco, confirming that "Isis" together with N 3 actually formed the starting-point among the images in the Yellow tier, and the left-to-right sequence within the Red tier. My former presumption of N 3 having formed a somewhat caricaturish later imitation of "Isis" so has to be discarded in favour of the view that "Isis" by the artist indeed has been meant to attack N 3, which on intention was drawn in a derogatory fashion. I cannot suggest a reason for no oars having initially been shown in the engagement scene, and for the mast of N 3 standing, however without the yardarm and sail. At any rate Gra?'s view of "Isis" being shown in the port of Nymphaion (note 12) cannot be upheld. The second point refers to Morrison's suggestion that the name "Isis" had only later been added to the sgraffito. Making sure calls for more investigations, not feasible until the end of the exhibition in 1999, by the Hermitage's restoration team. The final expertise pending, I should put . forward an impression that the execution of the letters might differ slightly from the one of the ship's lines. The top of the initial "I" having been scratched into the white sgraffito border at the rear of the stolos also might support Mornson's view. Since the name forms one argument in Gra?'s interpretation of the splendid battleship being Egyptian there eventually should be considered its originally nameless drawing to have been executed by someone of a different (possibly hostile) nation, who even might have meant the derogatory image of N 3 to be a Ptolemaic vessel fleeing from the assault of the non-Egyptian battleship. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia Brill

Corrigenda & Addenda

Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia, Volume 5 (4): 1 – Jan 1, 1999
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Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0929-077X
eISSN
1570-0577
D.O.I.
10.1163/157005799X00241
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Abstract

356 CORRIGENDA & ADDENDA p. 304 line 12 a painted a warm dark red read a tier painted a purplish red p. 305 line 12 some clues read more clues p. 309 line 1 ad the standing semicircle: This shape comes much closer to the stoloi on Roman Republican coins of the "prora" group than to the ones on Macedonian coins of Antigonos Gonatas, Demetrios Poliorketes, or Antigonos Doson where such headplates or volutes are missing. p. 316 line 6 (Fig. I ) read (Fig. 1 ; 2,1-2) p. 318 line 29 (Fig. 2,5) read (Fig. 2,4) p. 320 footnote 57: On the other hand, the Punic ship from near Marsala (Frost et al. 1976/1980) had her pantry below the deck. p. 321 1 ad Warships in the Yellow tier, first paragraph: For the reason of the markedly different quality of both images, I had taken N 3 to have been a later addition to "Isis", which . was so to speak inspired by her model. The Hermitage exhibition in 1999 gave me my first chance to study both images together, making me agree that they have been executed as a unit, as the sgrafJito execution of N 3 suggests. So another explanation had to be found for the utterly crude drawing of the three-pronged ram, fitted to a round stempost as on "Isis" 61. N 3 so appears to be the intentionally caricaturish derogation of a vanquished foe fleeing from "Isis" with her mast standing but without her oars being shown in action. p. 329 line 9 without a rising bow read without rising at the bow " " line 20 C,10. read 7,10. p. 334 last line Fig. E,1.3.5 read Fig. 9,1.3.5 p. 336 ad first paragraph: In some Roman reliefs the raking foremast (artemo) is so stout as almost to be confounded with a raised boarding-bridge, but its round cross-section is clearly shown, and in the "Torlonia relief' of the 2nd century AD the foremast is being used as a derrick for holding a gangplank with a stevedore. " " ad footnote 80: Such a device seems to be shown in the graffito of a warship from Delos, but if the interpretation is correct, the graffito would postdate the known lifespan of the "raven" which seems to have been limited to the first Punic War. p. 345 line 9 Fig. C,7 read Fig. 7,7 ADDENDUM The Nymphaion Exhibition at the State Hermitage of St. Petersburg in the spring of 1999 gave me a chance of studying sgraffitti of "Isis" and N 3 in the context of the Back Wall. The first observation is due to the Hermitage's restoration team, and was brought to my know- ledge by D.E. ?istov: some thin lines have not been scratched into the brittle stucco but impressed into the stucco when still soft. In several places the yellow surface is preserved within these narrow grooves. I in 1993 had observed the same phenomenon in the Red Tier. It so is obvious that the decoration of both tiers had started simultaneously within a few hours from the application of the coloured stucco, confirming that "Isis" together with N 3 actually formed the starting-point among the images in the Yellow tier, and the left-to-right sequence within the Red tier. My former presumption of N 3 having formed a somewhat caricaturish later imitation of "Isis" so has to be discarded in favour of the view that "Isis" by the artist indeed has been meant to attack N 3, which on intention was drawn in a derogatory fashion. I cannot suggest a reason for no oars having initially been shown in the engagement scene, and for the mast of N 3 standing, however without the yardarm and sail. At any rate Gra?'s view of "Isis" being shown in the port of Nymphaion (note 12) cannot be upheld. The second point refers to Morrison's suggestion that the name "Isis" had only later been added to the sgraffito. Making sure calls for more investigations, not feasible until the end of the exhibition in 1999, by the Hermitage's restoration team. The final expertise pending, I should put . forward an impression that the execution of the letters might differ slightly from the one of the ship's lines. The top of the initial "I" having been scratched into the white sgraffito border at the rear of the stolos also might support Mornson's view. Since the name forms one argument in Gra?'s interpretation of the splendid battleship being Egyptian there eventually should be considered its originally nameless drawing to have been executed by someone of a different (possibly hostile) nation, who even might have meant the derogatory image of N 3 to be a Ptolemaic vessel fleeing from the assault of the non-Egyptian battleship.

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Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to SiberiaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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