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Cooking Up Consciousness

Cooking Up Consciousness Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 10, No. 2 (December 2013), 173­191 Editions Rodopi ©2013 The science of consciousness has much to gain from philosophical pragmatism. However, the state of both the science and philosophy of consciousness is dire. The two main metaphors for thinking about consciousness ­ John Searle's digestion model and Alva Nöe's dancing model ­ continue the creeping Cartesianism that inevitably and irrevocably sets mind apart from body and world. I elaborate a metaphor only previously introduced that aims to eliminate the dualistic undertones of the digestion and dancing metaphors. I argue that our prospects for a science of consciousness may improve if we begin thinking not in terms of consciousness as digestion or as dancing, but in terms of consciousness as cooking. There is no doubt that the sciences of life and mind have progressed significantly since the appearance of William James's The Principles of Psychology in 1890. Indeed, despite the eclipse of James's philosophical school after the Second World War, pragmatism seems to be the modus operandi of the cognitive sciences ­ at least according to Jerry Fodor, the arch-Cartesian of our time. Nevertheless, many of the pragmatist insights about the nature of mind and consciousness http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Pragmatism Brill

Cooking Up Consciousness

Contemporary Pragmatism , Volume 10 (2): 173 – Apr 21, 2013

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2013 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3429
eISSN
1875-8185
DOI
10.1163/18758185-90000265
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 10, No. 2 (December 2013), 173­191 Editions Rodopi ©2013 The science of consciousness has much to gain from philosophical pragmatism. However, the state of both the science and philosophy of consciousness is dire. The two main metaphors for thinking about consciousness ­ John Searle's digestion model and Alva Nöe's dancing model ­ continue the creeping Cartesianism that inevitably and irrevocably sets mind apart from body and world. I elaborate a metaphor only previously introduced that aims to eliminate the dualistic undertones of the digestion and dancing metaphors. I argue that our prospects for a science of consciousness may improve if we begin thinking not in terms of consciousness as digestion or as dancing, but in terms of consciousness as cooking. There is no doubt that the sciences of life and mind have progressed significantly since the appearance of William James's The Principles of Psychology in 1890. Indeed, despite the eclipse of James's philosophical school after the Second World War, pragmatism seems to be the modus operandi of the cognitive sciences ­ at least according to Jerry Fodor, the arch-Cartesian of our time. Nevertheless, many of the pragmatist insights about the nature of mind and consciousness

Journal

Contemporary PragmatismBrill

Published: Apr 21, 2013

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