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Constantinople III and Constantinople IV: Minorities Posing as the Voice of the Whole Church

Constantinople III and Constantinople IV: Minorities Posing as the Voice of the Whole Church AbstractDecisions at ecumenical councils required ‘unanimous’ consensus. This paper treats two councils, Constantinople III (680–81) and Constantinople IV (869–70), which issued decrees where the claim to unanimity was particularly contrived. Although the Acts of Constantinople III try to hide the fact, the account in the Liber pontificalis shows that it took imperial pressure and months of debate before the bishops of the patriarchate of Constantinople came over to the ‘orthodox’, dyothelete side. At Constantinople IV the lack of support for its anti-Photian decrees is shown by minimal number of bishops who chose to attend. These two councils are examples of ‘ecumenical’ decisions that, so far from being unanimous, enjoyed the genuine support of only a minority. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annuarium Historiae Conciliorum Brill

Constantinople III and Constantinople IV: Minorities Posing as the Voice of the Whole Church

Annuarium Historiae Conciliorum , Volume 49 (1): 11 – Apr 28, 2020

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0003-5157
eISSN
2589-0433
DOI
10.30965/25890433-04901007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractDecisions at ecumenical councils required ‘unanimous’ consensus. This paper treats two councils, Constantinople III (680–81) and Constantinople IV (869–70), which issued decrees where the claim to unanimity was particularly contrived. Although the Acts of Constantinople III try to hide the fact, the account in the Liber pontificalis shows that it took imperial pressure and months of debate before the bishops of the patriarchate of Constantinople came over to the ‘orthodox’, dyothelete side. At Constantinople IV the lack of support for its anti-Photian decrees is shown by minimal number of bishops who chose to attend. These two councils are examples of ‘ecumenical’ decisions that, so far from being unanimous, enjoyed the genuine support of only a minority.

Journal

Annuarium Historiae ConciliorumBrill

Published: Apr 28, 2020

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