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Conflict Management Learning? Policy Reflections and Institutional Reforms

Conflict Management Learning? Policy Reflections and Institutional Reforms Global Governance 5 (1999), 425–455 Conflict Management Learning? Policy Reflections and Institutional Reforms Anna Fosdick omplex political conflicts characterized by humanitarian tragedies continue to define the post–Cold War era. As a result, the interna- Ctional community confronts a crucial issue: Should it attempt to man- age challenging intrastate and interstate crises? If the answer is yes, policy- makers face the additional task of determining the best means of tackling multifaceted conflicts. Should the international community seek only to alle- viate the humanitarian fallout of political instability, or should it involve it- self in broader efforts to resolve the crisis? Does a peace need to be secured before international troops are deployed, or can a settlement be imposed on warring parties? Are the Blue Helmets and Blue Berets effective tools with which to tackle multifaceted crises, or are coalition efforts led by a great power the only sure way of securing a lasting peace in nations afflicted with political violence? What are the prospects for developing tools capable of performing more effectively the tasks of post–Cold War conflicts? As the international community works out the answers to such ques- tions, it will have to draw on the lessons of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Conflict Management Learning? Policy Reflections and Institutional Reforms

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-00504003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 5 (1999), 425–455 Conflict Management Learning? Policy Reflections and Institutional Reforms Anna Fosdick omplex political conflicts characterized by humanitarian tragedies continue to define the post–Cold War era. As a result, the interna- Ctional community confronts a crucial issue: Should it attempt to man- age challenging intrastate and interstate crises? If the answer is yes, policy- makers face the additional task of determining the best means of tackling multifaceted conflicts. Should the international community seek only to alle- viate the humanitarian fallout of political instability, or should it involve it- self in broader efforts to resolve the crisis? Does a peace need to be secured before international troops are deployed, or can a settlement be imposed on warring parties? Are the Blue Helmets and Blue Berets effective tools with which to tackle multifaceted crises, or are coalition efforts led by a great power the only sure way of securing a lasting peace in nations afflicted with political violence? What are the prospects for developing tools capable of performing more effectively the tasks of post–Cold War conflicts? As the international community works out the answers to such ques- tions, it will have to draw on the lessons of the

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 3, 1999

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