Conclusion: Managing Complexity

Conclusion: Managing Complexity International Negotiation 8: 179–186, 2003. © 2003 Kluwer Law International. Printed in the Netherlands. 179 Conclusion: Managing Complexity I. WILLIAM ZARTMAN Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, The Johns Hopkins University, 1740 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20036 USA (E-mail: zartman@sais-jhu.edu) Ten years ago, an innovative collaborative work identified the management of complexity as a paradigm for the analysis of multilateral negotiations (Zartman 1994). Recognizing that the enormous growth of research and knowledge about negotiation in recent decades applied almost exclusively to bilateral encounters, where the essential relation between the parties is structurally determined, it sought to test various conceptual approaches and develop an appropriate analytical context to guide the study of multilateral processes. Since complexity involves multiple parties, multiple roles, and multiple issues, its management concerns not just one of these multipli- cities but the entire party-issue space. Multilateral negotiators must simplify, structure, and orient these elements into a process that produces an outcome. Simplifying and structuring return the process to coalition building. Coali- tions are a prominent device in multilateral negotiations and the opportunity to build them constitutes an important distinction between bilateral and multi- lateral relations. But coalitions have been thought of almost http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Negotiation Brill

Conclusion: Managing Complexity

International Negotiation, Volume 8 (1): 179 – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2003 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1382-340X
eISSN
1571-8069
D.O.I.
10.1163/138234003769590712
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

International Negotiation 8: 179–186, 2003. © 2003 Kluwer Law International. Printed in the Netherlands. 179 Conclusion: Managing Complexity I. WILLIAM ZARTMAN Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, The Johns Hopkins University, 1740 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20036 USA (E-mail: zartman@sais-jhu.edu) Ten years ago, an innovative collaborative work identified the management of complexity as a paradigm for the analysis of multilateral negotiations (Zartman 1994). Recognizing that the enormous growth of research and knowledge about negotiation in recent decades applied almost exclusively to bilateral encounters, where the essential relation between the parties is structurally determined, it sought to test various conceptual approaches and develop an appropriate analytical context to guide the study of multilateral processes. Since complexity involves multiple parties, multiple roles, and multiple issues, its management concerns not just one of these multipli- cities but the entire party-issue space. Multilateral negotiators must simplify, structure, and orient these elements into a process that produces an outcome. Simplifying and structuring return the process to coalition building. Coali- tions are a prominent device in multilateral negotiations and the opportunity to build them constitutes an important distinction between bilateral and multi- lateral relations. But coalitions have been thought of almost

Journal

International NegotiationBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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