Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

CONCILIATIONISM WITHOUT UNIQUENESS

CONCILIATIONISM WITHOUT UNIQUENESS Grazer Philosophische Studien 88 (2013), 161­188. CONCILIATIONISM WITHOUT UNIQUENESS Matthew LEE University of Notre Dame Summary I defend Conciliationism: rationality requires belief revision of epistemic peers who nd themselves in disagreement and lack dispute-independent reason to suspect each other of error. (Kelly 2010) argues that Conciliationists are committed to the Uniqueness esis: a given body of evidence rationalizes a unique degree of con dence for a given proposition. (Ballantyne and Co man 2012) cogently critique Kelly's argument and propose an improved version. I contend that their version of the argument is unsound, and I o er some friendly amendments. But I show that even this amended argument threatens only extreme versions of Conciliationism. 1. Introduction At center stage in the epistemology of disagreement is Conciliationism-- the view that peer disagreement calls for a conciliatory, rather than a dogmatic, response. Somewhat more precisely, Conciliationism is the view that when you nd yourself in disagreement with an epistemic peer,1 a change in belief (or con dence) is rationally required, provided you have no independent reason to suspect your peer of error.2 Conciliationism as such does not dictate just how your view should change;3 but it categori1. e relevant notion of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Grazer Philosophische Studien Brill

CONCILIATIONISM WITHOUT UNIQUENESS

Grazer Philosophische Studien , Volume 88 (1): 161 – Jan 1, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/conciliationism-without-uniqueness-Be0BD36gWM
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2013 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0165-9227
eISSN
1875-6735
DOI
10.1163/9789401210508_009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Grazer Philosophische Studien 88 (2013), 161­188. CONCILIATIONISM WITHOUT UNIQUENESS Matthew LEE University of Notre Dame Summary I defend Conciliationism: rationality requires belief revision of epistemic peers who nd themselves in disagreement and lack dispute-independent reason to suspect each other of error. (Kelly 2010) argues that Conciliationists are committed to the Uniqueness esis: a given body of evidence rationalizes a unique degree of con dence for a given proposition. (Ballantyne and Co man 2012) cogently critique Kelly's argument and propose an improved version. I contend that their version of the argument is unsound, and I o er some friendly amendments. But I show that even this amended argument threatens only extreme versions of Conciliationism. 1. Introduction At center stage in the epistemology of disagreement is Conciliationism-- the view that peer disagreement calls for a conciliatory, rather than a dogmatic, response. Somewhat more precisely, Conciliationism is the view that when you nd yourself in disagreement with an epistemic peer,1 a change in belief (or con dence) is rationally required, provided you have no independent reason to suspect your peer of error.2 Conciliationism as such does not dictate just how your view should change;3 but it categori1. e relevant notion of

Journal

Grazer Philosophische StudienBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2013

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month