Comparative Respiratory Physiology and Ecology of Phyllopod Crustacea. I. Conchostraca 1 )

Comparative Respiratory Physiology and Ecology of Phyllopod Crustacea. I. Conchostraca 1 ) COMPARATIVE RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY OF PHYLLOPOD CRUSTACEA. I. CONCHOSTRACA 1 ) BY CLYDE H. ERIKSEN Joint Science Department, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, Ca., U.S.A. and ROBERT J. BROWN Biological Sciences, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, Ca., U.S.A. INTRODUCTION A. The Comparative Study In their 1960 review, Wolvekamp & Waterman noted that the Crustacea did not appear innovative in their respiratory functions but such a generalization may be unwarranted because data were scattered and incomplete. Today that statement still typifies at least the primitive orders of the class: Anostraca, Notostraca and Conchostraca: the phyllopod Crustacea. Such neglect is probably related to their restricted geographic distribution and unpredictable availability caused by a rapid life cycle in ephemeral ponds. The egg, their outstanding adaptational feature for withstanding periods be- tween free water, has been studied most (e.g., Brock, 1965; Brown & Carpelan, 1971). Little is known about the way phyllopods respond to the highly variable conditions that exist when water is present. Scholander et al. ( 195 3 ) suggested that the most obvious adaptations of metabolic rate might occur in temperate species whose habitat temperatures change most. The phyllopods, common in- habitants of temporary waters with widely http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Crustaceana Brill

Comparative Respiratory Physiology and Ecology of Phyllopod Crustacea. I. Conchostraca 1 )

Crustaceana, Volume 39 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 1980

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1980 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0011-216x
eISSN
1568-5403
DOI
10.1163/156854080X00247
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

COMPARATIVE RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY OF PHYLLOPOD CRUSTACEA. I. CONCHOSTRACA 1 ) BY CLYDE H. ERIKSEN Joint Science Department, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, Ca., U.S.A. and ROBERT J. BROWN Biological Sciences, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, Ca., U.S.A. INTRODUCTION A. The Comparative Study In their 1960 review, Wolvekamp & Waterman noted that the Crustacea did not appear innovative in their respiratory functions but such a generalization may be unwarranted because data were scattered and incomplete. Today that statement still typifies at least the primitive orders of the class: Anostraca, Notostraca and Conchostraca: the phyllopod Crustacea. Such neglect is probably related to their restricted geographic distribution and unpredictable availability caused by a rapid life cycle in ephemeral ponds. The egg, their outstanding adaptational feature for withstanding periods be- tween free water, has been studied most (e.g., Brock, 1965; Brown & Carpelan, 1971). Little is known about the way phyllopods respond to the highly variable conditions that exist when water is present. Scholander et al. ( 195 3 ) suggested that the most obvious adaptations of metabolic rate might occur in temperate species whose habitat temperatures change most. The phyllopods, common in- habitants of temporary waters with widely

Journal

CrustaceanaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1980

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