Community Development in the Neoteric Community

Community Development in the Neoteric Community Community Development in the Neoteric Community * JOHN C. BELCHER and WILFRID C. BAILEY University of Georgia, Athens, U.S.A. A BASIC PRINCIPLE of community development has been that change must be accomplished through a modification of the existing culture. There is a general belief that failures in action programs may be attributed to an inability or unwillingness to base them on culture. A large body of literature has accu- mulated through the years illustrating situations where culture was ignored and, as a consequence, action programs failed (Spicer 1952 and Foster 1969). Implicit in the assertion that successful change programs must be based on existing culture is the assumption that all major social norms are deeply in- grained in tradition. Nevertheless, there are many situations in the modern world where cultural roots are extremely shallow and there are few really traditional cultural norms or values. There must be some other bases for change than culture if there are no deeply ingrained traditions. Perhaps these are situations where ecological factors must be the basis for changes. Groups that have experienced very rapid change inevitably will lose much of their traditional heritage. Such a condition could develop where the basic means http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology) Brill

Community Development in the Neoteric Community

International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology) , Volume 15 (1-2): 1 – Jan 1, 1974

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 1974 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0020-7152
eISSN
1745-2554
D.O.I.
10.1163/156854274X00017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Community Development in the Neoteric Community * JOHN C. BELCHER and WILFRID C. BAILEY University of Georgia, Athens, U.S.A. A BASIC PRINCIPLE of community development has been that change must be accomplished through a modification of the existing culture. There is a general belief that failures in action programs may be attributed to an inability or unwillingness to base them on culture. A large body of literature has accu- mulated through the years illustrating situations where culture was ignored and, as a consequence, action programs failed (Spicer 1952 and Foster 1969). Implicit in the assertion that successful change programs must be based on existing culture is the assumption that all major social norms are deeply in- grained in tradition. Nevertheless, there are many situations in the modern world where cultural roots are extremely shallow and there are few really traditional cultural norms or values. There must be some other bases for change than culture if there are no deeply ingrained traditions. Perhaps these are situations where ecological factors must be the basis for changes. Groups that have experienced very rapid change inevitably will lose much of their traditional heritage. Such a condition could develop where the basic means

Journal

International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1974

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