COLLOQUIUM 2

COLLOQUIUM 2 NOTES A number of my Notre Dame colleagues read various versions of this paper and helped me to improve it: Gretchen Reydams-Schils, Robert Vacca, Henry Weinfield, and my student Anne Marie DeLuca. The comments of Michael Pakaluk and the BACAP's anonymous referee have also been helpful. William Wians, my host and a long-time pillar of the BACAP, provided indispensable support, both practical and intellectual. My thanks to them all. Unkempt, ill-shod, poorly dressed, Socrates was still the Helen of Greek philosophy, and the thousand ships he launched are still sailing. Some of the most brilliant young men in a city teeming with brilliant young men loved him more than their fathers, and were fascinated by the words he spoke and the example he set. No account of Socrates can be convincing if it does not explain what made him fascinating. In particular, every interpretation of Socrates owes us some account of his attractiveness to politically ambitious young men. Perhaps it is possible that men of the ilk of Alcibiades, Charmides, and Xenophon were fascinated by aspects of Socrates that had little direct connection to their own sense of themselves as potential leaders and rulers. And to be sure, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy Online Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1059-986X
eISSN
2213-4417
D.O.I.
10.1163/2213441798X00054
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

NOTES A number of my Notre Dame colleagues read various versions of this paper and helped me to improve it: Gretchen Reydams-Schils, Robert Vacca, Henry Weinfield, and my student Anne Marie DeLuca. The comments of Michael Pakaluk and the BACAP's anonymous referee have also been helpful. William Wians, my host and a long-time pillar of the BACAP, provided indispensable support, both practical and intellectual. My thanks to them all. Unkempt, ill-shod, poorly dressed, Socrates was still the Helen of Greek philosophy, and the thousand ships he launched are still sailing. Some of the most brilliant young men in a city teeming with brilliant young men loved him more than their fathers, and were fascinated by the words he spoke and the example he set. No account of Socrates can be convincing if it does not explain what made him fascinating. In particular, every interpretation of Socrates owes us some account of his attractiveness to politically ambitious young men. Perhaps it is possible that men of the ilk of Alcibiades, Charmides, and Xenophon were fascinated by aspects of Socrates that had little direct connection to their own sense of themselves as potential leaders and rulers. And to be sure,

Journal

Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy OnlineBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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