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Collectivistic Individualism: Dewey and MacIntyre

Collectivistic Individualism: Dewey and MacIntyre Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 3, No. 1 (June 2006), 69­83 Editions Rodopi © 2006 John Dewey and Alasdair MacIntyre are seldom considered philosophically compatible. Yet, both critique contemporary liberalism by focusing on the pervasiveness of atomistic, pecuniary, laissez-faire individualism. I argue that Dewey and MacIntyre have not abandoned individualism as much as reconstructed the concept. Dewey's and MacIntyre's conceptions of human flourishing rely on a nuanced conception of individualism, which I term "." John Dewey and Alasdair MacIntyre are very critical of contemporary liberalism.1 Interestingly, both provide genealogies of contemporary liberalism. Dewey's critical genealogy focuses on the disparity between liberal ideals and the actual conditions produced by contemporary liberalism. MacIntyre's critical genealogy focuses on the modern and postmodern rejection of the ThomistAristotelian teleological tradition, and the subsequent lack of a public rationale or justification for moral and political claims. While their accounts deviate, both Dewey and MacIntyre agree that the atomistic, pecuniary, laissez-faire individualism of contemporary liberalism is one of the chief problems. Dewey and MacIntyre are not critiquing liberalism as such, but only that strain of liberalism that propagates laissez-faire individualism. In this article I provide an analysis of Dewey's and MacIntyre's nuanced notions of individualism. In the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Pragmatism Brill

Collectivistic Individualism: Dewey and MacIntyre

Contemporary Pragmatism , Volume 3 (1): 69 – Apr 21, 2006

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2006 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3429
eISSN
1875-8185
DOI
10.1163/18758185-90000033
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 3, No. 1 (June 2006), 69­83 Editions Rodopi © 2006 John Dewey and Alasdair MacIntyre are seldom considered philosophically compatible. Yet, both critique contemporary liberalism by focusing on the pervasiveness of atomistic, pecuniary, laissez-faire individualism. I argue that Dewey and MacIntyre have not abandoned individualism as much as reconstructed the concept. Dewey's and MacIntyre's conceptions of human flourishing rely on a nuanced conception of individualism, which I term "." John Dewey and Alasdair MacIntyre are very critical of contemporary liberalism.1 Interestingly, both provide genealogies of contemporary liberalism. Dewey's critical genealogy focuses on the disparity between liberal ideals and the actual conditions produced by contemporary liberalism. MacIntyre's critical genealogy focuses on the modern and postmodern rejection of the ThomistAristotelian teleological tradition, and the subsequent lack of a public rationale or justification for moral and political claims. While their accounts deviate, both Dewey and MacIntyre agree that the atomistic, pecuniary, laissez-faire individualism of contemporary liberalism is one of the chief problems. Dewey and MacIntyre are not critiquing liberalism as such, but only that strain of liberalism that propagates laissez-faire individualism. In this article I provide an analysis of Dewey's and MacIntyre's nuanced notions of individualism. In the

Journal

Contemporary PragmatismBrill

Published: Apr 21, 2006

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