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Climate Change: Governance Challenges for Copenhagen

Climate Change: Governance Challenges for Copenhagen Global Governance 15 (2009), 443-449 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Climate Change: Governance Challenges for Copenhagen Adrian Macey limate change has been described as “a diabolical policy problem . . . harder than any other issue of high importance that has come before our C polity in living memory.” To deal with it effectively involves many dif- ferent policy areas. These include not only the obvious ones like energy, but also others such as macroeconomic and fiscal policy, food security, health, water, trade, biodiversity, and even immigration. The financial implications of climate change—impacts, adaptation, and mitigation—are huge and growing. There is a need for massive deployment of technology, a sector notoriously difficult to regulate. Climate change also involves time frames unknown in public policy. There is currently no overall governance arrangement to inte- grate all these dimensions. The Bonn-based UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) secretariat, with its mandate defined by the ex- isting convention and the Kyoto Protocol, can easily be seen as too narrow in scope and expertise, and too small to cope with the scale and complexity of this global challenge. It is often pointed out that the international institutional framework is sec- torally based, whereas climate change http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Climate Change: Governance Challenges for Copenhagen

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01504004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 15 (2009), 443-449 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Climate Change: Governance Challenges for Copenhagen Adrian Macey limate change has been described as “a diabolical policy problem . . . harder than any other issue of high importance that has come before our C polity in living memory.” To deal with it effectively involves many dif- ferent policy areas. These include not only the obvious ones like energy, but also others such as macroeconomic and fiscal policy, food security, health, water, trade, biodiversity, and even immigration. The financial implications of climate change—impacts, adaptation, and mitigation—are huge and growing. There is a need for massive deployment of technology, a sector notoriously difficult to regulate. Climate change also involves time frames unknown in public policy. There is currently no overall governance arrangement to inte- grate all these dimensions. The Bonn-based UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) secretariat, with its mandate defined by the ex- isting convention and the Kyoto Protocol, can easily be seen as too narrow in scope and expertise, and too small to cope with the scale and complexity of this global challenge. It is often pointed out that the international institutional framework is sec- torally based, whereas climate change

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 12, 2009

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