Citizenship, Political Violence, and Democratization in Africa

Citizenship, Political Violence, and Democratization in Africa Global Governance 10 (2004), 403–409 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Citizenship, Political Violence, and Democratization in Africa Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja he denial of full citizenship rights to selected individuals and groups in Africa has triggered political violence. In many in- T stances, these conflicts have slowed down the democratization process, which is essential for pulling Africa out of poverty and plac- ing it more firmly on the path of stability and sustainable development. This failure to democratize has implications for national, regional, and global governance. During the current wave of democratization, incumbents bent on prolonging their stay in power have used exclusionary notions of citi- zenship to bar their most challenging rivals from the electoral process. The best-known examples of this practice are the disqualification of for- mer president Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia and former prime minister Alassane Dramane Ouattara of Côte d’Ivoire from presidential elections in 1996 and 2000, respectively. Because one was a founding father and the other had served as head of government under the venerable Félix Houphouet-Boigny, the incumbent regimes felt compelled to resort to constitutional gymnastics to justify their political exclusion on the basis of citizenship. In the Zambian case, that Kaunda’s parents had migrated from Malawi when http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/citizenship-political-violence-and-democratization-in-africa-ReXDndAuSo
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01004002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 10 (2004), 403–409 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Citizenship, Political Violence, and Democratization in Africa Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja he denial of full citizenship rights to selected individuals and groups in Africa has triggered political violence. In many in- T stances, these conflicts have slowed down the democratization process, which is essential for pulling Africa out of poverty and plac- ing it more firmly on the path of stability and sustainable development. This failure to democratize has implications for national, regional, and global governance. During the current wave of democratization, incumbents bent on prolonging their stay in power have used exclusionary notions of citi- zenship to bar their most challenging rivals from the electoral process. The best-known examples of this practice are the disqualification of for- mer president Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia and former prime minister Alassane Dramane Ouattara of Côte d’Ivoire from presidential elections in 1996 and 2000, respectively. Because one was a founding father and the other had served as head of government under the venerable Félix Houphouet-Boigny, the incumbent regimes felt compelled to resort to constitutional gymnastics to justify their political exclusion on the basis of citizenship. In the Zambian case, that Kaunda’s parents had migrated from Malawi when

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 3, 2004

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month