Chinese and Soviet Attitudes toward International Law: A Comparative Approach

Chinese and Soviet Attitudes toward International Law: A Comparative Approach 131 Chinese and Soviet Attitudes toward International Law: A Comparative Approach Athanassios Vamvoukos LL.B (University of Thessaloniki), M.C.L. (The George Washington University), D.Phil. Candidate (Oxford University) 1. Introductory Remarks The attitudes of Chinese Communist legal writers toward international law, their conception of its functions, and their interpretation of the meanings of the key terms are predictably different from and often opposed to those of their Western counterparts. While differences existed before the establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949, these became more pronounced with the Chinese Communists' adoption of Marxism-Leninism as their official state ideology. The divergence has increasingly become centered on the concept of sovereignty, and on assumptions as to its nature and its relationship to international law. Despite the emergence of the People's Republic of China as a nuclear power, and its ever-growing influence in world affairs, very little so far has been written on China's attitude toward international law., Systematic attempts have yet to be made to probe the peculiarities of Chinese contemporary behavior concerning international law observation. We know very little so far about China's present and future motivations, or lack of them, to play the rote of a law-abiding country. Lack http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Review of Socialist Law (in 1992 continued as Review of Central and East European Law) Brill

Chinese and Soviet Attitudes toward International Law: A Comparative Approach

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1979 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0165-0300
eISSN
1875-2985
D.O.I.
10.1163/157303579X00109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

131 Chinese and Soviet Attitudes toward International Law: A Comparative Approach Athanassios Vamvoukos LL.B (University of Thessaloniki), M.C.L. (The George Washington University), D.Phil. Candidate (Oxford University) 1. Introductory Remarks The attitudes of Chinese Communist legal writers toward international law, their conception of its functions, and their interpretation of the meanings of the key terms are predictably different from and often opposed to those of their Western counterparts. While differences existed before the establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949, these became more pronounced with the Chinese Communists' adoption of Marxism-Leninism as their official state ideology. The divergence has increasingly become centered on the concept of sovereignty, and on assumptions as to its nature and its relationship to international law. Despite the emergence of the People's Republic of China as a nuclear power, and its ever-growing influence in world affairs, very little so far has been written on China's attitude toward international law., Systematic attempts have yet to be made to probe the peculiarities of Chinese contemporary behavior concerning international law observation. We know very little so far about China's present and future motivations, or lack of them, to play the rote of a law-abiding country. Lack

Journal

Review of Socialist Law (in 1992 continued as Review of Central and East European Law)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1979

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