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CHINA'S EARLIEST INHABITANTS

CHINA'S EARLIEST INHABITANTS CHINA’S EARLIEST INHABITANTS BY JOHN W. OLSEN (University of Arizona) Abstract Recent reevaluations of the absolute chronology of human ancestry in East Asia, par- ticularly China and Indonesia, yield the not unexpected conclusion that eastern Eurasian Homo erectus may be synchronic with the earliest members of that hypodigm known from Africa. In the past decade, both archaeological and paleontological evidence has come to light in China suggesting the presence of human ancestors prior to the Matuyama [R] chron–Brunhes [N] chron boundary of ca. 730,000 BP. Preliminary chronometric data derived from several localities indicate ages in excess of one million years. For the past two decades, south China has dominated the picture of palaeoanthropological discovery in the easternmost Old World. Local- ities discovered in Yunnan, Guangxi, Guizhou, and elsewhere south of the Yangzi drainage have yielded both fossil and cultural remains radi- cally altering interpretations of primate and human evolution in the region (Olsen and Miller-Antonio 1992). Among the most recent of these discoveries are those made in 1992 at Shanghuang in southern Jiangsu province (Beard et al. 1994). Setting the stage for subsequent primate evolution in the region, the middle Eocene Shanghuang fauna comprises at least two species http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of East Asian Archaeology Brill

CHINA'S EARLIEST INHABITANTS

Journal of East Asian Archaeology , Volume 2 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2000 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1387-6813
eISSN
1568-5233
DOI
10.1163/156852300509691
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHINA’S EARLIEST INHABITANTS BY JOHN W. OLSEN (University of Arizona) Abstract Recent reevaluations of the absolute chronology of human ancestry in East Asia, par- ticularly China and Indonesia, yield the not unexpected conclusion that eastern Eurasian Homo erectus may be synchronic with the earliest members of that hypodigm known from Africa. In the past decade, both archaeological and paleontological evidence has come to light in China suggesting the presence of human ancestors prior to the Matuyama [R] chron–Brunhes [N] chron boundary of ca. 730,000 BP. Preliminary chronometric data derived from several localities indicate ages in excess of one million years. For the past two decades, south China has dominated the picture of palaeoanthropological discovery in the easternmost Old World. Local- ities discovered in Yunnan, Guangxi, Guizhou, and elsewhere south of the Yangzi drainage have yielded both fossil and cultural remains radi- cally altering interpretations of primate and human evolution in the region (Olsen and Miller-Antonio 1992). Among the most recent of these discoveries are those made in 1992 at Shanghuang in southern Jiangsu province (Beard et al. 1994). Setting the stage for subsequent primate evolution in the region, the middle Eocene Shanghuang fauna comprises at least two species

Journal

Journal of East Asian ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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