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Chin-Straps of the Early Northern Wei: New Perspectives on the Trans-Asiatic Diffusion of Funerary Practices

Chin-Straps of the Early Northern Wei: New Perspectives on the Trans-Asiatic Diffusion of... © Brill, Leiden 2006 JEAA 5, 1–4 CHIN-STRAPS OF THE EARLY NORTHERN WEI: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON THE TRANS-ASIATIC DIFFUSION OF FUNERARY PRACTICES BY SHING MÜLLER (Ludwig-Maximilans-Universität, München) Abstract Based on an excavated bronze chin-strap from the Northern Wei tomb M107 at the cemetery south of Datong, the author examines the custom of using such a metal device to hold the jaw of the deceased in China. The starting point of the custom in the Asian part of the Eurasian continent was probably the Tarim Basin in the 8th century BC, but there are significant earlier parallels in West Asia and the Mediterranean world. The custom was brought by tribal members of the Tuoba-Xianbei no later than the 5th century AD to the Northern Wei capital, Pingcheng (modern Datong), where the use of chin-straps was first evidenced in China proper. At that time, the use of metal chin-straps was apparently restricted to certain non-Chinese members of Northern Wei society. There is no archaeological or written evidence that the Chinese applied such a device onto the face of the deceased before the Tang. In Tang times some Chinese up- per class members also adopted the custom of using metal chin-straps. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of East Asian Archaeology Brill

Chin-Straps of the Early Northern Wei: New Perspectives on the Trans-Asiatic Diffusion of Funerary Practices

Journal of East Asian Archaeology , Volume 5 (1): 27 – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2003 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1387-6813
eISSN
1568-5233
DOI
10.1163/156852303776172971
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Brill, Leiden 2006 JEAA 5, 1–4 CHIN-STRAPS OF THE EARLY NORTHERN WEI: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON THE TRANS-ASIATIC DIFFUSION OF FUNERARY PRACTICES BY SHING MÜLLER (Ludwig-Maximilans-Universität, München) Abstract Based on an excavated bronze chin-strap from the Northern Wei tomb M107 at the cemetery south of Datong, the author examines the custom of using such a metal device to hold the jaw of the deceased in China. The starting point of the custom in the Asian part of the Eurasian continent was probably the Tarim Basin in the 8th century BC, but there are significant earlier parallels in West Asia and the Mediterranean world. The custom was brought by tribal members of the Tuoba-Xianbei no later than the 5th century AD to the Northern Wei capital, Pingcheng (modern Datong), where the use of chin-straps was first evidenced in China proper. At that time, the use of metal chin-straps was apparently restricted to certain non-Chinese members of Northern Wei society. There is no archaeological or written evidence that the Chinese applied such a device onto the face of the deceased before the Tang. In Tang times some Chinese up- per class members also adopted the custom of using metal chin-straps.

Journal

Journal of East Asian ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2003

Keywords: CHIN-STRAPS; FACE-COVERS; PINGCHENG PERIOD; TUOBA; NORTHERN WEI; TARIM-BASIN

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