Ceremonial Gatherings of the Magpie Pica Pica: Territory Probing and Acquisition

Ceremonial Gatherings of the Magpie Pica Pica: Territory Probing and Acquisition CEREMONIAL GATHERINGS OF THE MAGPIE PICA PICA: TERRITORY PROBING AND ACQUISITION by T. R. BIRKHEAD and K. CLARKSON1) (Department of Zoology, The University, Sheffield S10 2TN, England) (With 3 Figures) (Acd., 18-II-1985) The conspicuous and spectacular ceremonial gatherings of the magpie Pica pica have been recorded and described by several workers (e.g. STEWART, 1910; WYNNE-EDWARDS, 1962; VINES, 1981), but their func- tion has remained obscure. Suggested functions include pair formation (DARWIN, 1874; STUBBS, 1910; BROWN, 1942) and competition for nest sites or territories (BAHRMANN, 1956; BAEYENS, 1979). Our preliminary observations supported BAEYENS' idea that gatherings were associated with competition for space. This is reasonable since the magpie is a resi- dent, permanently territorial species whose populations often contain floaters (BAEYENS, 1981a; VINES, 1981; CLARKSON, 1984; this study). Under such conditions competition for territories is likely to be intense. This paper describes the ceremonial gatherings of magpies and examines the idea that they are associated with competition for breeding space. Study area and methods The study was conducted in the Rivelin Valley on the outskirts of Sheffield (see BIRKHEAD, 1979, for details). Observations were made between 1978 and 1984. Approx- imately 75 % of all the magpies in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Ceremonial Gatherings of the Magpie Pica Pica: Territory Probing and Acquisition

Behaviour , Volume 94 (3-4): 324 – Jan 1, 1985

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/ceremonial-gatherings-of-the-magpie-pica-pica-territory-probing-and-0bw7XzR0g9
Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 1985 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853985X00244
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CEREMONIAL GATHERINGS OF THE MAGPIE PICA PICA: TERRITORY PROBING AND ACQUISITION by T. R. BIRKHEAD and K. CLARKSON1) (Department of Zoology, The University, Sheffield S10 2TN, England) (With 3 Figures) (Acd., 18-II-1985) The conspicuous and spectacular ceremonial gatherings of the magpie Pica pica have been recorded and described by several workers (e.g. STEWART, 1910; WYNNE-EDWARDS, 1962; VINES, 1981), but their func- tion has remained obscure. Suggested functions include pair formation (DARWIN, 1874; STUBBS, 1910; BROWN, 1942) and competition for nest sites or territories (BAHRMANN, 1956; BAEYENS, 1979). Our preliminary observations supported BAEYENS' idea that gatherings were associated with competition for space. This is reasonable since the magpie is a resi- dent, permanently territorial species whose populations often contain floaters (BAEYENS, 1981a; VINES, 1981; CLARKSON, 1984; this study). Under such conditions competition for territories is likely to be intense. This paper describes the ceremonial gatherings of magpies and examines the idea that they are associated with competition for breeding space. Study area and methods The study was conducted in the Rivelin Valley on the outskirts of Sheffield (see BIRKHEAD, 1979, for details). Observations were made between 1978 and 1984. Approx- imately 75 % of all the magpies in the

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1985

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial