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CERAMIC WATER DROPPERS IN THE COLLECTION OF THE PRINCESSEHOF: FANCY SHAPES, SURPRISING USES

CERAMIC WATER DROPPERS IN THE COLLECTION OF THE PRINCESSEHOF: FANCY SHAPES, SURPRISING USES Eva Stroeber* CERAMIC WAtER DROPPERs IN tHE COLLECtION OF tHE PRINCEssEHOF : FANCy sHAPEs, sURPRIsINg UsEs the Princessehof Museum collection includes many spectacular objects, but also many minor masterpieces created for the appreciation of the connoisseur. Modest in size their shapes are surprising and their use is varied. Water droppers, for example. Every educated Chinese, be it 2000 years ago or today, had and has to use a number of objects when writing. traditionally the four treasures (sibao) on a Chinese scholar’s desk are ink, an inkstone, a brush and paper. Ink was made from pinewood soot and organic glue. to these basic ingredients, aromas or perfumes like musk were often added. to obtain a usable shape the mixture was pressed into moulds, and its water content evaporated as it solidified into inksticks. to use it, tiny quantities of water were dropped onto the plain surface of the inkstone before the inkstick was rubbed on it, and to control the amount of water the Chinese invented the water dropper. Water droppers (shuizhu) were original known as ‘water dropper for the inkstone’ (yandi). A ‘classical’ water dropper has two openings: one for water and one for air. the dropper is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aziatische Kunst Brill

CERAMIC WATER DROPPERS IN THE COLLECTION OF THE PRINCESSEHOF: FANCY SHAPES, SURPRISING USES

Aziatische Kunst , Volume 46 (1): 9 – Jul 11, 2016

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
eISSN
2543-1749
DOI
10.1163/25431749-90000308
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Eva Stroeber* CERAMIC WAtER DROPPERs IN tHE COLLECtION OF tHE PRINCEssEHOF : FANCy sHAPEs, sURPRIsINg UsEs the Princessehof Museum collection includes many spectacular objects, but also many minor masterpieces created for the appreciation of the connoisseur. Modest in size their shapes are surprising and their use is varied. Water droppers, for example. Every educated Chinese, be it 2000 years ago or today, had and has to use a number of objects when writing. traditionally the four treasures (sibao) on a Chinese scholar’s desk are ink, an inkstone, a brush and paper. Ink was made from pinewood soot and organic glue. to these basic ingredients, aromas or perfumes like musk were often added. to obtain a usable shape the mixture was pressed into moulds, and its water content evaporated as it solidified into inksticks. to use it, tiny quantities of water were dropped onto the plain surface of the inkstone before the inkstick was rubbed on it, and to control the amount of water the Chinese invented the water dropper. Water droppers (shuizhu) were original known as ‘water dropper for the inkstone’ (yandi). A ‘classical’ water dropper has two openings: one for water and one for air. the dropper is

Journal

Aziatische KunstBrill

Published: Jul 11, 2016

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