Can human texture discrimination be mimicked by a computer model using local Fourier analysis?

Can human texture discrimination be mimicked by a computer model using local Fourier analysis? Research note Can human texture discrimination be mimicked by a computer model using local Fourier analysis? ED GRIFFITHS and TOM TROSCIANKO*‡ IBM UK Scientific Centre, Athelstan House, St Clement Street, Winchester, Hants S023 9DR, UK Received 29 January 1991; revised 12 June 1991; accepted 13 June 1991 There has been much interest recently in the modelling of human early vision using models which have receptive field units tuned to orientation and spatial frequency and which are thought to be similar to receptive fields in biological vision. This note describes further work which shows that a model which uses Gabor filters as the receptive fields can account for human texture-discrimination data; in particular, it predicts experimental data which have been used to argue against this model. Gabor filters, originally described by Gabor (1946), are attractive for modelling biological vision both because they closely model measured receptive field properties (Pollen et al., 1984; Daugman, 1985) and because they have the property of minimis- ing the uncertainty of both spatial and frequency localization (Daugman, 1985). They are also simple to apply computationally. In addition, Fogel and Sagi (1989) provide evidence in favour of Gabor-type texture discrimination. Rubenstein and Sagi (1990) and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010) Brill

Can human texture discrimination be mimicked by a computer model using local Fourier analysis?

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1992 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0169-1015
eISSN
1568-5683
D.O.I.
10.1163/156856892X00208
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Research note Can human texture discrimination be mimicked by a computer model using local Fourier analysis? ED GRIFFITHS and TOM TROSCIANKO*‡ IBM UK Scientific Centre, Athelstan House, St Clement Street, Winchester, Hants S023 9DR, UK Received 29 January 1991; revised 12 June 1991; accepted 13 June 1991 There has been much interest recently in the modelling of human early vision using models which have receptive field units tuned to orientation and spatial frequency and which are thought to be similar to receptive fields in biological vision. This note describes further work which shows that a model which uses Gabor filters as the receptive fields can account for human texture-discrimination data; in particular, it predicts experimental data which have been used to argue against this model. Gabor filters, originally described by Gabor (1946), are attractive for modelling biological vision both because they closely model measured receptive field properties (Pollen et al., 1984; Daugman, 1985) and because they have the property of minimis- ing the uncertainty of both spatial and frequency localization (Daugman, 1985). They are also simple to apply computationally. In addition, Fogel and Sagi (1989) provide evidence in favour of Gabor-type texture discrimination. Rubenstein and Sagi (1990) and

Journal

Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1992

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