Call for Papers

Call for Papers CALL FOR PAPERS Special Issue on Visual Symmetries Feature Editor: Christopher W. Tyler Some of the most striking constraints in the physical world are the symmetries that exist in objects, from crystals through living organisms at all levels in the phylo- genetic scale to manufactured articles of many kinds. There is significant evidence that the visual system has evolved adaptive strategies for perceiving such symmetries and using them to aid in object recognition and the reconstruction of the visual world. The main kinds of symmetry of interest in spatial vision are reflection (or bilateral) symmetry, rotation (or axial) symmetry, translational (or repetition) symmetry, size-scaling (or fractal self-similarity), and the many permutations of these basic types. These forms of symmetry may occur in terms of 2D and 3D spatial arrange- ments, in the time domain, or in 4D spatiotemporal events (symmetry of motion paths). Further perceptual symmetries are available through conjunction with the intensive stimulus dimensions of luminance and chrominance contrast. Papers for this Special Issue are invited in any area of detection, perception, recog- nition and computational analysis relating to these domains of perceptual symmetry, with the aim of enhancing our understanding of the visual processing of symmetries. Manuscripts should be sumbitted to: Dr C. W. Tyler Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute 2232 Webster St San Francisco CA 94115 USA http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010) Brill
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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1993 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0169-1015
eISSN
1568-5683
D.O.I.
10.1163/156856893X00496
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CALL FOR PAPERS Special Issue on Visual Symmetries Feature Editor: Christopher W. Tyler Some of the most striking constraints in the physical world are the symmetries that exist in objects, from crystals through living organisms at all levels in the phylo- genetic scale to manufactured articles of many kinds. There is significant evidence that the visual system has evolved adaptive strategies for perceiving such symmetries and using them to aid in object recognition and the reconstruction of the visual world. The main kinds of symmetry of interest in spatial vision are reflection (or bilateral) symmetry, rotation (or axial) symmetry, translational (or repetition) symmetry, size-scaling (or fractal self-similarity), and the many permutations of these basic types. These forms of symmetry may occur in terms of 2D and 3D spatial arrange- ments, in the time domain, or in 4D spatiotemporal events (symmetry of motion paths). Further perceptual symmetries are available through conjunction with the intensive stimulus dimensions of luminance and chrominance contrast. Papers for this Special Issue are invited in any area of detection, perception, recog- nition and computational analysis relating to these domains of perceptual symmetry, with the aim of enhancing our understanding of the visual processing of symmetries. Manuscripts should be sumbitted to: Dr C. W. Tyler Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute 2232 Webster St San Francisco CA 94115 USA

Journal

Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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