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Border effects on brightness: A review of findings, models and issues

Border effects on brightness: A review of findings, models and issues Border effects on brightness: A review of findings, models and issues FRED KINGDOM and BERNARD MOULDEN Department of Psychology, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, Berks, RG62AL, UK Received 8 June 1988; revised 18 January 1989; accepted 23 January 1989 Abstract � This paper presents a summary of experimental findings, theoretical models and unresolved issues regarding border effects on brightness, of which the Cornsweet illusion (Cornsweet, 1970 Visual Perception. Academic Press: New York) is the best-known example. It is argued that no current theoretical model completely accounts for the wide variety of effects described. Contrast sensitivity function (CSF) models can explain many low-contrast, but not high-contrast, border effects. Lightness integration models based on Land and McCann's retinex theory (Land and McCann, 1971. J. Opt. Soc. Am. 61, pp.1-11) have the advantage over CSF models in that they predict transitivity of border effects where they are found to occur. However, they fail to predict the appearance of a variety of Cornsweet-like figures, have never been tested with relatively high contrast versions of those figures, and have only been implemented by qualitative demonstration. It is argued that edge-detector models are potentially the most promising theoretical candidates but, as with lightness-integration models, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010) Brill

Border effects on brightness: A review of findings, models and issues

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1988 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0169-1015
eISSN
1568-5683
DOI
10.1163/156856888X00140
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Border effects on brightness: A review of findings, models and issues FRED KINGDOM and BERNARD MOULDEN Department of Psychology, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, Berks, RG62AL, UK Received 8 June 1988; revised 18 January 1989; accepted 23 January 1989 Abstract � This paper presents a summary of experimental findings, theoretical models and unresolved issues regarding border effects on brightness, of which the Cornsweet illusion (Cornsweet, 1970 Visual Perception. Academic Press: New York) is the best-known example. It is argued that no current theoretical model completely accounts for the wide variety of effects described. Contrast sensitivity function (CSF) models can explain many low-contrast, but not high-contrast, border effects. Lightness integration models based on Land and McCann's retinex theory (Land and McCann, 1971. J. Opt. Soc. Am. 61, pp.1-11) have the advantage over CSF models in that they predict transitivity of border effects where they are found to occur. However, they fail to predict the appearance of a variety of Cornsweet-like figures, have never been tested with relatively high contrast versions of those figures, and have only been implemented by qualitative demonstration. It is argued that edge-detector models are potentially the most promising theoretical candidates but, as with lightness-integration models,

Journal

Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1988

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