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Book Reviews

Book Reviews 29 Review of Central and East European Law 2004 No.4, 549-558 © 2004 Koninklijke Brill N.V. Printed in The Netherlands Book Reviews Simon Clarke Making Ends Meet in Contemporary Russia Secondary Employment, Subsidiary Agriculture and Social Networks Edward Elgar: Cheltenham (UK) & Northampton (MA) 2002, 283 pp. US$ 90 (hardback). ISBN 1-84064-262-9 Life has not been easy on Russians in the 1990s. They have had to withstand a deep economic crisis: the loss of employment as well as two fi nancial cri- ses, which reduced the value of their money overnight. Yet, there has been no famine and Russians seem to survive. The economic explanation for this phenomenon has been sought in the overvaluation of income in the Soviet period and undervaluation of income in the post-Soviet period. The informal economy supposedly is big, and people have the produce of dacha plots upon which they can fall back. This makes the fall of real income—as opposed to offi cial income—much less dramatic than it seems. 1 Another explanation for the survival of Russians goes into the preservation of the old system of blat . 2 The techniques of getting goods and services seem to work in the new http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Review of Central and East European Law Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2004 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0925-9880
eISSN
1573-0352
DOI
10.1163/1573035042523631
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

29 Review of Central and East European Law 2004 No.4, 549-558 © 2004 Koninklijke Brill N.V. Printed in The Netherlands Book Reviews Simon Clarke Making Ends Meet in Contemporary Russia Secondary Employment, Subsidiary Agriculture and Social Networks Edward Elgar: Cheltenham (UK) & Northampton (MA) 2002, 283 pp. US$ 90 (hardback). ISBN 1-84064-262-9 Life has not been easy on Russians in the 1990s. They have had to withstand a deep economic crisis: the loss of employment as well as two fi nancial cri- ses, which reduced the value of their money overnight. Yet, there has been no famine and Russians seem to survive. The economic explanation for this phenomenon has been sought in the overvaluation of income in the Soviet period and undervaluation of income in the post-Soviet period. The informal economy supposedly is big, and people have the produce of dacha plots upon which they can fall back. This makes the fall of real income—as opposed to offi cial income—much less dramatic than it seems. 1 Another explanation for the survival of Russians goes into the preservation of the old system of blat . 2 The techniques of getting goods and services seem to work in the new

Journal

Review of Central and East European LawBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2004

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