Book Reviews

Book Reviews Chester Brown, A Common Law of International Adjudication. International Courts and Tribunals Series. Oxford University Press, Oxford 2007, ISBN-10: 0199206503/ISBN-13: 9780199206506, liii+303 pp., GBP 165.00 The ‘proliferation’ of international courts and tribunals has become one of the major topics of current international law discourse. Literature on this relatively new pheno- menon has largely focused on problems such as competing jurisdiction or inconsistent case law. Chester Brown’s book focuses on the possible interaction between adjudicative institutions in relation to the procedural and related rules applied. The international law governing procedure, evidence and remedies, though increasing at fast rate, still is sailing to a great extent through uncharted waters. This is largely due to two reasons. For one, the constituent documents establishing the pertinent international court or tribunal only provide for a very rudimentary legal framework that directs the court or tribunal how to conduct its proceedings, how it should take evidence and what remedies it may apply. It is mainly up to the relevant judicial body to elaborate more detailed rules, either by way of establishing specifi c rules of procedure or by developing its own procedural law through jurisprudence – or both. However, until recently, international case law has http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Austrian Review of International and European Law Online Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2010 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1385-1306
eISSN
1573-6512
D.O.I.
10.1163/15736512-90000023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chester Brown, A Common Law of International Adjudication. International Courts and Tribunals Series. Oxford University Press, Oxford 2007, ISBN-10: 0199206503/ISBN-13: 9780199206506, liii+303 pp., GBP 165.00 The ‘proliferation’ of international courts and tribunals has become one of the major topics of current international law discourse. Literature on this relatively new pheno- menon has largely focused on problems such as competing jurisdiction or inconsistent case law. Chester Brown’s book focuses on the possible interaction between adjudicative institutions in relation to the procedural and related rules applied. The international law governing procedure, evidence and remedies, though increasing at fast rate, still is sailing to a great extent through uncharted waters. This is largely due to two reasons. For one, the constituent documents establishing the pertinent international court or tribunal only provide for a very rudimentary legal framework that directs the court or tribunal how to conduct its proceedings, how it should take evidence and what remedies it may apply. It is mainly up to the relevant judicial body to elaborate more detailed rules, either by way of establishing specifi c rules of procedure or by developing its own procedural law through jurisprudence – or both. However, until recently, international case law has

Journal

Austrian Review of International and European Law OnlineBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2007

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