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Book Review: The Qing Opening to the Ocean: Chinese Maritime Policies , 1684–1757 , written by Zhao Gang . Honolulu: Univ. of Hawai’i Press, 2013. viii + 272 pp.

Book Review: The Qing Opening to the Ocean: Chinese Maritime Policies , 1684–1757 , written by... This is probably the first book in Western literature to treat the maritime policies of the former part of the Qing dynasty as a whole. Three main events are picked out for detailed discussion: the opening of the coast for trade in 1684, the ban of Chinese shipping to Southeast Asia in 1717 (called “1716 ban” in this book), and the confinement of European trade to Canton in 1757. As the author gives short summaries of each chapter on pp. 16–17, it is not necessary to duplicate them here. The book treats the early Qing policy toward maritime trade as an “open-door” policy. I agree with this, since after the maritime ban against Koxinga and his heirs had been lifted, China opened its ports for traders to come and go throughout the period under discussion, though not without adjustments and modifications as the occasion demanded. In rebuffing those who consider that the early Qing “open-door” maritime policy was limited, the author correctly remarks that, besides the foreigners’ trade, there was also the trade conducted by the Chinese themselves. Many Chinese scholars, when reviewing the Qing maritime trade policy, emphasize the confinement of China’s foreign trade to Canton after http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png T'oung Pao Brill

Book Review: The Qing Opening to the Ocean: Chinese Maritime Policies , 1684–1757 , written by Zhao Gang . Honolulu: Univ. of Hawai’i Press, 2013. viii + 272 pp.

T'oung Pao , Volume 100 (1-3): 280 – Nov 24, 2014

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0082-5433
eISSN
1568-5322
DOI
10.1163/15685322-10013p010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This is probably the first book in Western literature to treat the maritime policies of the former part of the Qing dynasty as a whole. Three main events are picked out for detailed discussion: the opening of the coast for trade in 1684, the ban of Chinese shipping to Southeast Asia in 1717 (called “1716 ban” in this book), and the confinement of European trade to Canton in 1757. As the author gives short summaries of each chapter on pp. 16–17, it is not necessary to duplicate them here. The book treats the early Qing policy toward maritime trade as an “open-door” policy. I agree with this, since after the maritime ban against Koxinga and his heirs had been lifted, China opened its ports for traders to come and go throughout the period under discussion, though not without adjustments and modifications as the occasion demanded. In rebuffing those who consider that the early Qing “open-door” maritime policy was limited, the author correctly remarks that, besides the foreigners’ trade, there was also the trade conducted by the Chinese themselves. Many Chinese scholars, when reviewing the Qing maritime trade policy, emphasize the confinement of China’s foreign trade to Canton after

Journal

T'oung PaoBrill

Published: Nov 24, 2014

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