Beyond Resistance and Collaboration: Amadu Bamba and the Murids of Senegal

Beyond Resistance and Collaboration: Amadu Bamba and the Murids of Senegal BEYOND RESISTANCE AND COLLABORATION: AMADU BAMBA AND THE MURIDS OF SENEGAL BY DAVID ROBINSON (Michigan State University, U.S.A.) Analysts of contemporary Senegal typically give two impressions of the Islamic brotherhood called the Muridiyya.' The first is the strong position of the brotherhood in political and economic affairs. From its anchor in the center of the peanut basin the Murids have spread into virtually every agricultural zone of western Senegal and developed a reputation as productive peanut farmers. They have also spread into the coastal cities, including the old colonial capitals of St. Louis and Dakar, and become masters in the arts of contem- porary politics. It is not inaccurate to say that France governed the peanut basin from 1920 to 1960 in conjunction with the Murid hierarchy in a kind of indirect rule reminiscent of the systems estab- lished under the sultan of Morocco and the emirs of Northern Nigeria, and that the independent regimes of Leopold Senghor and Abdou Diouf have continued in this tradition. The second impression is the continuing veneration of the founder of the order, Amadu Bamba Mback6 (ca. 1850-1927). Senegalese Muslims construe Amadu Bamba as a saint, pedagogue, master poet, and hero of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Religion in Africa Brill

Beyond Resistance and Collaboration: Amadu Bamba and the Murids of Senegal

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/beyond-resistance-and-collaboration-amadu-bamba-and-the-murids-of-BZwZVbHsjx
Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 1991 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0022-4200
eISSN
1570-0666
D.O.I.
10.1163/157006691X00276
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BEYOND RESISTANCE AND COLLABORATION: AMADU BAMBA AND THE MURIDS OF SENEGAL BY DAVID ROBINSON (Michigan State University, U.S.A.) Analysts of contemporary Senegal typically give two impressions of the Islamic brotherhood called the Muridiyya.' The first is the strong position of the brotherhood in political and economic affairs. From its anchor in the center of the peanut basin the Murids have spread into virtually every agricultural zone of western Senegal and developed a reputation as productive peanut farmers. They have also spread into the coastal cities, including the old colonial capitals of St. Louis and Dakar, and become masters in the arts of contem- porary politics. It is not inaccurate to say that France governed the peanut basin from 1920 to 1960 in conjunction with the Murid hierarchy in a kind of indirect rule reminiscent of the systems estab- lished under the sultan of Morocco and the emirs of Northern Nigeria, and that the independent regimes of Leopold Senghor and Abdou Diouf have continued in this tradition. The second impression is the continuing veneration of the founder of the order, Amadu Bamba Mback6 (ca. 1850-1927). Senegalese Muslims construe Amadu Bamba as a saint, pedagogue, master poet, and hero of

Journal

Journal of Religion in AfricaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1991

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off